hapten

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Related to Haptens: Epitopes

hapten

 [hap´ten]
a small molecule, not antigenic by itself, that can react with specific antibodies and elicit the formation of such antibodies when conjugated to a larger antigenic molecule, usually a protein, called in this context the carrier. Antibody production involves activation of B lymphocytes by the hapten and helper T cells by the carrier.

hap·ten

(hap'-ten),
A molecule that is incapable, by itself, of causing a cell-mediated or humoral immune response but can, however, combine with a larger antigenic molecule called a carrier. A hapten-carrier complex can stimulate antibody production and reactive T-cells.
See also: hapten inhibition of precipitation.
[G. haptō, to fasten, bind]

hapten

/hap·ten/ (hap´ten) partial antigen; a specific nonprotein substance which does not itself elicit antibody formation but does elicit the immune response when coupled with a carrier protein.hapten´ic

hapten

(hăp′tĕn′) also

haptene

(-tēn′)
n.
A small molecule that reacts with a specific antibody but cannot induce the formation of antibodies unless bound to a carrier protein or other large antigenic molecule.

hap·ten′ic adj.

hapten

[hap′tən]
Etymology: Gk, haptein, to grasp
a small molecule that acts as an antigen by combining with particular bonding sites on an antibody. By itself it cannot induce an immune response, but when bonded to a carrier protein may cause an immune response.

hap·ten

(hap'tĕn)
A molecule that is incapable, alone, of causing the production of antibodies but can, however, combine with a larger antigenic molecule called a carrier.
Synonym(s): incomplete antigen, partial antigen.
[G. haptō, to fasten, + -en, noun suffix]

hapten

An incomplete antigen that cannot, by itself, promote antibody formation but that can do so when conjugated to a protein. Most haptens are organic substances of low molecular weight. From the Greek haptein , to fasten.

hapten

a substance that is able to combine with specific antibodies but does not produce them unless attached to a large CARRIER MOLECULE.

hap·ten

(hap'tĕn)
A molecule that is incapable, alone, of causing the production of antibodies but can, however, combine with a larger antigenic molecule called a carrier.
Synonym(s): incomplete antigen, partial antigen.
[G. haptō, to fasten, + -en, noun suffix]

hapten (hap´tən),

n a nonproteinaceous substance that acts as an antigen by combining with particular bonding sites on an antibody. Unlike a true antigen, it does not induce the formation of antibodies. A hapten bonded to a carrier protein may induce an immune response. Also called
haptene.

hapten, haptene

a small-molecular-weight either inorganic or organic molecule that alone is not antigenic but which when linked to a carrier protein, e.g. albumin, is antigenic; the antibody so produced will react with the hapten alone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Limited quantitative hapten inhibition studies carried out on a small serum sample from a subject with "suspected narcotic allergy" showed marked IgE antibody reactivity with morphine, pethidine and fentanyl (124).
It can be used to detect DNA, RNA, proteins and haptens.
At most, they could act as haptens, an agent that may provoke a hypersensitivity response when complexed to a carrier but will not act as an antigen alone.
Pretargeted immunoscintigraphy of murine tumors with indium-111-labeled bifunctional haptens.
Released metal ions or particles can act as small-molecular-weight haptens that bind to proteins or cells and form organometallic complexes, which can become immunogenic antigens or allergens (55-57).
It is well established that epicutaneous application of haptens can induce contact hypersensitivity (CHS).
Our prior patent in this field, issued in 2000, included the use of a gallium PET isotope also attached to targeting proteins and haptens, thus providing various product options.
DECREASED ANTIBODY CATALYTIC ACTIVITY ELICITED BY FLEXIBLE TRANSITION STATE ANALOG HAPTENS
Until now, ideas about the way antibodies bind to foreign bodies have been largely based on studies done with haptens.
Haptogen focuses on drug discovery and development of therapeutic antibodies that bind haptens and haptenic structures.
Filaggrin deficiency confers a paracellular barrier abnormality that reduces inflammatory thresholds to irritants and haptens.
Therefore, most immunoassays for detection of haptens use a competitive format, in which only 1 antihapten antibody is used and the hapten to be detected competes with a labeled hapten for binding to the antibody.