Hand Transplantation

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The allografting of a hand from a cadaveric donor to a recipient who has lost same in an accident. They are technically demanding procedures which require 8-12 hours in contrast to heart transplants that require 6-8 hours. The procedure begins with the most structurally traumatic—bone fixation—followed by tendon fixation, and lastly arterial, nerve and venous anastomoses
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THE first woman to have a double hand transplant said: "They are beautiful," as she left hospital after a month yesterday.
A New Zealand man who underwent the world's first hand transplant is in danger of losing the hand 18 months after it was grafted onto his arm.
18 /PRNewswire/ -- Matthew Scott, the world's first successful hand transplant recipient, and Jerry Fisher, the nation's second recipient, provided a glimpse of how the hand transplant procedure has changed their lives at a press briefing on Friday, February 14 at Jewish Hospital.
After hearing about the first hand transplant, performed in January 1998 at the Edouard Herriot Hospital in Lyon, France, and meeting recipient Clint Hallam.
14 /PRNewswire/ -- Matt Scott, the world's first successful hand transplant recipient and Jerry Fisher, the nation's second recipient will be in Louisville this week for their yearly check-ups.
The recipient of the world's first hand transplant says his transplant is deteriorating rapidly while the physicians who recently performed the second such transplant January 24 in Louisville say their patient is making "excellent" progress.
According to Foucher, the ideal hand transplant recipient is a young person who has recently lost both hands due to accident, frostbite, or clotting problems.
According to the hand transplant teams represented at the International Congress of The Transplantation Society, hand transplantation and other types of composite tissue transplantation would benefit patients whose limbs have been severed or amputated or who require reconstructive surgery due to tumor resections or congenital deformities.
The 2 lead surgeons, Jean-Michel Dubernard of France and Earl Owen from Australia, performed the world's first single hand transplant on Clint Hallum in September 1998 at the same hospital.
DOCTORS yesterday said they have successfully done the first double hand transplant on a woman in Valencia, eastern Spain.
The first person to ever have a hand transplant, Clint Hallam from New Zealand, had it removed after 13 years, saying he felt "mentally detached" from the hand.
05pm A hand transplant, carried out at Leeds General Infirmary at the tail-end of last year, is the subject of this film.