handedness

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handedness

 [hand´ed-nes]
the preferential use of the hand of one side in all voluntary motor acts; see also dextrality and sinistrality.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nes), [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.

handedness

/hand·ed·ness/ (hand´ed-nes) the preferential use of the hand of one side in voluntary motor acts.

handedness

[han′didnes]
Etymology: AS, hand + ness, condition
a preference for use of either the left or right hand. The preference is related to cerebral dominance: left-handedness corresponds to dominance of the right side of the brain, and vice versa. Also called chirality, laterality.
Chemistry The left- or right-sidedness, or asymmetry of virtually everything in the universe from the ‘lowly’ molecule to highly complex organisms
Neurology A state of dominance of use of a preferred side, as in left-handed or right-handed

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs)
Preference for the use of one hand, most commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.

handedness

The natural tendency to use one hand rather than the other for skilled manual tasks such as writing. Ambidexterity-the indifferent use of either hand-is rare. About 10% of people are left-handed.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs) [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right.
References in periodicals archive ?
This approach typically results in an approximately equal number of left- and right-handers, and a varying percentage of animals with no hand preference.
This indicates a relatively weak connection between hand preference and speech control in the brain, says Canadian neuropsychologist Sandra F.
In fact, foot preference may be more closely aligned with brain function than is hand preference, he says.
However, a growing number of researchers are challenging the long-held notion that nonhuman primates have no hand preferences.
Kuhl is one proponent of the idea that monkeys have hand preferences.
They contend hand preferences do indeed exist among nonhuman primates and have gone largely unnoticed by researchers.
MacNeilage and his co-workers dispute the longstanding theory that hand preferences first appeard as evolutionary pressures forced the ancestors of modern humans to manufacture and use stone tools.
The animals nearly always use their left hands to reach for food floating in a moat, she says, while their hand preferences for reaching during foraging lean only slightly to the left.
You really have to make the animals work to see consistent left- and right- hand preferences," he asserts.
MacNeilage's argument for primate hand preferences receives further support from investigations showing a divvying up of some mental responsibilities in the brain hemispheres of monkeys.
Marchant, who regards predominant right-handedness as an evolved trait in hominids, is intrigued by Uomini's ideas about the impact of complex tool use on hand preferences.