handedness

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handedness

 [hand´ed-nes]
the preferential use of the hand of one side in all voluntary motor acts; see also dextrality and sinistrality.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nes), [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.

handedness

/hand·ed·ness/ (hand´ed-nes) the preferential use of the hand of one side in voluntary motor acts.

handedness

[han′didnes]
Etymology: AS, hand + ness, condition
a preference for use of either the left or right hand. The preference is related to cerebral dominance: left-handedness corresponds to dominance of the right side of the brain, and vice versa. Also called chirality, laterality.
Chemistry The left- or right-sidedness, or asymmetry of virtually everything in the universe from the ‘lowly’ molecule to highly complex organisms
Neurology A state of dominance of use of a preferred side, as in left-handed or right-handed

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs)
Preference for the use of one hand, most commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.

handedness

The natural tendency to use one hand rather than the other for skilled manual tasks such as writing. Ambidexterity-the indifferent use of either hand-is rare. About 10% of people are left-handed.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs) [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right.
References in periodicals archive ?
With time, obligatory use of right hand has dropped dramatically, increasing the number of subjects who used the left hand preference, from about 3% in 1910 to 12% in subjects born after World War II.
Several authors have developed questionnaires to measure hand preference (46-49).
Thus, even when compliance with the experimenter's request entailed no loss of reinforcement but only the possible inconvenience of reaching to the side opposite the hand preference, instructional control was weaker than it was when the request was expressed as a procedural requirement and compliance resulted in a loss of reinforcement.
7% of older participants either left-handed or with a history of attempts to switch hand preference from left to right.
The theories of Annett (1985) and of McManus (1985) both postulate a pair of alleles of a single autosomal gene as the mediators of the genetic influence on handedness, though they differ in regard to the question of whether it is hand skill or hand preference that is subject to genetic influence, and whether handedness is a primary or secondary manifestation of a genetic contribution.
Pilot work suggested that a major hindrance to establishing schedule control was a preference for the side corresponding to the subject's stated hand preference.
They pointed out that for the patients who had bilateral involvement of their HFM, the side most affected was uniformly predictive of hand preference.
Earlier hand preference (handedness) would indicate a problem with the opposite arm and hand.
In Annett's hand preference classification procedure, the basic decision as to the sinistrality or dextrality of the individual is made on the basis of the hand preferred for writing.
Because hand preference likely has a prenatal origin, the analysis supports the idea that sexual orientation also has early neurobiological roots, says Kenneth J.
Hand preference usually doesn't emerge until about 18 months, so if your child does not use both hands equally when he or she is younger than 18 months, you should mention this to your child's doctor.