Hamilton Depression Scale


Also found in: Acronyms.

Hamilton Depression Scale

(ham'il-ton),
test comprising 21 questions in a physician-run survey on depressed mood, feelings of guilt, suicide, insomnia, and hypochondriasis.
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The recruited patients were assessed again at week 0 with the help of CDAI questionnaire, an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ), a Visual Analogue Scale (VA-Scale) and 21-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD).
Correlation analysis between aberrant functional networks connectivity patterns and the Hamilton Depression Scale scores
The 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) [9] was used to assess the severity of depressive symptoms.
The threshold for inclusion was a score greater than 16 on the Hamilton depression scale (13).
Follow-up at 1 year and at 18 months found significant improvements in scores on the Hamilton Depression scale, the Montgomery-Asburg Depression Rating Scale, and the Global Assessment of Functioning scale, compared with baseline.
Methods: One hundred and fifty patients, 25-70 years old, meeting ICD-10 criteria for mild or moderately severe depressed episodes or with dysthymia, and having a 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale for Depression (HAM-D) total score between 7 and 17, were randomly assigned to an extract.
All patients were also assessed for depression at baseline using the Hamilton Depression Scale.
Included are instruments such as the Folstein Mini Mental State Examination, the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, the Hamilton Depression Scale, and many others.
Montreal cognitive assessment and Hamilton depression scale were used to exclude serious cognition and depression issues.
A score of 20 or above on the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D), a score of 2 or above on the HAM-D item 1 for depressed mood, and a score of 12 or less on the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were required at baseline for study enrollment.
5% hypericin, respectively, showed lower scores on the Hamilton Depression Scale in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study (Laakmann et al.

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