ham

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Ham

(ham),
Thomas Hale, U.S. physician, 1905-1987. See: Ham test.

ham

(ham),
1. Synonym(s): popliteal fossa
2. The buttock and back part of the thigh.
[A.S.]

HAM

HTLV-I-associated myelopathy. See Tropical spastic paraparesis.

ham

[AS. haum, haunch]
1. The popliteal space or region behind the knee.
2. A common name for the thigh, hip, and buttock.

ham, hams

the musculature of the upper thigh; common usage implies the cured upper thigh of a full-grown pig.

ham beetle
the 0.5 inch long larvae of the beetle which infest hams. Called also Dermestes lardarius.
ham curing
ham fly
the larvae or skippers, because of their habit of leaping long distances, of the fly Piophila casei which invade cured ham.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, both Arbaugh and Gaillard were able to use their ham radios to send news of the quake to those outside the country.
The Burmese government, then as now, was a paranoid, xenophobic military dictatorship that totally prohibited ham radio.
If you are homeschooling, ham radio is an excellent teaching tool and your kids will love it.
Each ham radio operator has their own equipment, and if the person is alive, our radios will work.
HAM RADIO IS A NEW old hobby that includes doctors, businessmen, construction workers and teachers among the 6,976 Arkansans who are licensed to practice, according to the Amateur Radio Relay League.
Even so, the former ham radio operator admits he is no paging expert.
In fact, my uncle, a ham radio operator whose "shack" was perched on a Palos Verdes, California, bluff overlooking a large patch of ocean not far from the naval shipyard at San Pedro, spotted what might have been a small submarine offshore that same year.
Even if the astronauts don't pick your class, you can still use a ham radio to listen in on all kinds of shuttle-to-Earth communications.
Two-way communication via UHF uplink and VHF downlink, for use by ham radio operators
If the moon is up, there's a good chance Joseph Taylor is on his ham radio, using a homemade antenna in his backyard to bounce signals off the moon's pockmarked face.
Since 1933, ham radio operators have established temporary ham radio stations in public locations during Field Day to showcase the science and skill of Amateur Radio.
He was a ham radio and radio airplane enthusiast, spending many years as a member of the 10-10 Ham Radio Club; Pioneer Valley Radio Airplane Club and the Springfield Model Yacht Club.