Hallucination


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Related to Hallucination: auditory hallucination, visual hallucination

hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(ha-lū-si-nā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
The apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

/hal·lu·ci·na·tion/ (hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun) a sense perception (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation.hallu´cinativehallu´cinatory
haptic hallucination  tactile h.
kinesthetic hallucination  a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
somatic hallucination  a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience with the body.
hypnagogic hallucination  one occurring just at the onset of sleep.
hypnopompic hallucination  one occurring during awakening.
tactile hallucination  one involving the sense of touch.

hallucination

(hə-lo͞o′sə-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Perception of visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or gustatory stimuli in the absence of any external objects or events and with a compelling sense of their reality, resulting from certain mental and physical disorders or as a response to a drug.
b. The objects or events so perceived.
2. A false or mistaken idea.

hal·lu′ci·na′tion·al, hal·lu′ci·na′tive adj.

hallucination

[həlo̅o̅′sinā′shən]
Etymology: L, alucinari, to wander in mind
a sensory perception that does not result from an external stimulus and that occurs in the waking state. It can occur in any of the senses and is classified accordingly as auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile, or visual. It is a symptom of psychotic behavior, often noted during schizophrenia, as well as of other mental or organic disorders and conditions. hallucinate [həlo̅o̅′sənāt] v., hallucinations, adj.
A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, which is characterised by false or distorted perception of objects or events—e.g., sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch—often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality

hallucination

Neurology A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, characterized by false or distorted perception of objects or events–eg, sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch, often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality. See Command, Functional, Hypnogenic, Hypnopompic, Olfactory hallucination. Cf Illusion, Schizophrenia.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn)
The subjective perception of an object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

A sense perception in the absence of an external cause. Hallucinations may involve sights (visual hallucinations), sounds (auditory), smells (olfactory), tastes (gustatory), touch (tactile) or size (dimensional). Hallucinations should be distinguished from delusions-which are mistaken ideas.

Hallucination

A sensory experience of something that does not exist outside the mind. A person can experience a hallucination in any of the five senses. Auditory hallucinations are a common symptom of schizophrenia.

hallucination,

n a phenomenon where-by subjects believe that they see another person or object that is not really present.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
Apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination (həloo´sinā´shən),

n an artificial sensory experience without the presence of an external cause.

Patient discussion about Hallucination

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

More discussions about Hallucination
References in periodicals archive ?
Around 60-70% of people who have schizophrenia experience auditory hallucinations that are typically insulting and threatening.
Hallucinations in CBS are believed to reduce with time, but in 75% of individuals, the condition persists for five years or longer.
Smith 2014 assessed the auditory hallucination by the PSYCHRATS hallucination scale, however we did not find the data for this scale, so we did not include the scale.
Second, we did not assess the status of hallucination symptoms during the MRI, which means that some patients likely experienced AVH, whereas others may not have, during the MRI course.
Kaneko Y, Oda Y, Goto F, Two cases of intractable auditory hallucination successfully treated with sound therapy.
Visual hallucinations among geriatric patients are a common and confusing presentation.
The 69-year-old - a maths teacher called Sylvia who also played the piano and has perfect pitch - suffered musical hallucinations that kept her awake at night.
In this study, we wanted to find out the relationship of private and public self-focus and mindfulness skills to hallucination proneness in healthy subjects.
explores various ways writers of the 19th and early 20th centuries depicted the phenomenon of hallucination, and the uses to which they put the unusual figure or experience.
Hallucinations--sights, sounds, smells, and tactile impressions without an external physical cause--have long been considered the product of acute mental illness or brain damage "even though the vast majority of hallucinations have no such dark implications," Sacks writes.
22), researchers found that functioning people who "hallucinated" God were high on the "absorption" scale and that 4 percent of people studied reported hallucinations.
These diagnostic criteria included the presence of at least one hallucination within the past four weeks, a period between the first and the previous hallucination exceeding four weeks, full or partial retention of insight into the unreal nature of the hallucinations, the absence of hallucinations in other sensory modalities, and the absence of delusions.