Hallucination


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Related to Hallucination: auditory hallucination, visual hallucination

hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(ha-lū-si-nā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
The apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

/hal·lu·ci·na·tion/ (hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun) a sense perception (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation.hallu´cinativehallu´cinatory
haptic hallucination  tactile h.
kinesthetic hallucination  a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
somatic hallucination  a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience with the body.
hypnagogic hallucination  one occurring just at the onset of sleep.
hypnopompic hallucination  one occurring during awakening.
tactile hallucination  one involving the sense of touch.

hallucination

(hə-lo͞o′sə-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Perception of visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or gustatory stimuli in the absence of any external objects or events and with a compelling sense of their reality, resulting from certain mental and physical disorders or as a response to a drug.
b. The objects or events so perceived.
2. A false or mistaken idea.

hal·lu′ci·na′tion·al, hal·lu′ci·na′tive adj.

hallucination

[həlo̅o̅′sinā′shən]
Etymology: L, alucinari, to wander in mind
a sensory perception that does not result from an external stimulus and that occurs in the waking state. It can occur in any of the senses and is classified accordingly as auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile, or visual. It is a symptom of psychotic behavior, often noted during schizophrenia, as well as of other mental or organic disorders and conditions. hallucinate [həlo̅o̅′sənāt] v., hallucinations, adj.
A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, which is characterised by false or distorted perception of objects or events—e.g., sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch—often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality

hallucination

Neurology A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, characterized by false or distorted perception of objects or events–eg, sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch, often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality. See Command, Functional, Hypnogenic, Hypnopompic, Olfactory hallucination. Cf Illusion, Schizophrenia.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn)
The subjective perception of an object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

A sense perception in the absence of an external cause. Hallucinations may involve sights (visual hallucinations), sounds (auditory), smells (olfactory), tastes (gustatory), touch (tactile) or size (dimensional). Hallucinations should be distinguished from delusions-which are mistaken ideas.

Hallucination

A sensory experience of something that does not exist outside the mind. A person can experience a hallucination in any of the five senses. Auditory hallucinations are a common symptom of schizophrenia.

hallucination,

n a phenomenon where-by subjects believe that they see another person or object that is not really present.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
Apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination (həloo´sinā´shən),

n an artificial sensory experience without the presence of an external cause.

Patient discussion about Hallucination

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

More discussions about Hallucination
References in periodicals archive ?
The cause of the hallucinations could not be deciphered, but the woman was given treatment and is now free of the horrific hallucinations.
Mohammed Jalal Al Raisi, Director of Communication and Community Service at the ADFCA, said that the inspectors conducted a comprehensive survey on the tea sales in Abu Dhabi, Al Ain and the Western Region retail outlets, pointing out that the physical examination showed lack of any impurities or hallucination pills in different tested teabags.
A patient - known only as Sylvia - could hold the key to treatment for a rare >ear condition which causes musical hallucination
Washington, August 21 ( ANI ): Neuroscientists have reported a new type of hallucinations, where patients start hearing music that is unrecognizable to them though is familiar to people around them.
explores various ways writers of the 19th and early 20th centuries depicted the phenomenon of hallucination, and the uses to which they put the unusual figure or experience.
Hallucinations--sights, sounds, smells, and tactile impressions without an external physical cause--have long been considered the product of acute mental illness or brain damage "even though the vast majority of hallucinations have no such dark implications," Sacks writes.
22), researchers found that functioning people who "hallucinated" God were high on the "absorption" scale and that 4 percent of people studied reported hallucinations.
These diagnostic criteria included the presence of at least one hallucination within the past four weeks, a period between the first and the previous hallucination exceeding four weeks, full or partial retention of insight into the unreal nature of the hallucinations, the absence of hallucinations in other sensory modalities, and the absence of delusions.
76%), the most commonly experienced hallucination by the entire sample (74%).
of Groningen, the Netherlands) presents articles on five categories of the phenomenon: specific symptoms, medical conditions and substances associated with the mediation of hallucinations, definitions of the terms hallucination and illusion by some important historical authors, historical figures who are known to have experienced hallucinations, and miscellaneous issues.
45) is far more competitive than the morning odds might otherwise suggest and, given the make-up of the race, the fast-improving Hallucination represents monster each-way value at 20-1 with Bet365.
Thus subjective mental phenomena are accepted as real and patients develop visual and auditory hallucination.