Hall

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Hall

 [hawl]
Lydia E. (1906–1969) founder and first director of the Loeb Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. Her work as a researcher and consultant at the New York Heart Association and as project director of nursing and long-term illnesses for the Division of Chronic Illnesses and Tuberculosis of the U.S. Public Health Service led her to believe that the nurse-patient relationship is therapeutic in itself and that the chief need of the chronically ill patient is professional nursing care. The establishment of the Loeb Center, providing professional nursing care in an institutional setting, enabled her to put her theories into practice.

Hall, Lydia E

(1906-1969), a nursing theorist who presented her Care, Core, and Cure Model in "Nursing: What Is It?" in The Canadian Nurse (1964). Hall believed that nursing functions differently in three overlapping circles that constitute aspects of patients. She labeled the circles the body (the care), the disease (the cure), and the person (the core). Hall viewed nursing in relation to the core aspect as concerned with the therapeutic use of self in communicating with the patient. Care is the nurturing, comforting component, the "hands-on" care of the patient. Cure is the aspect of nursing involved with treatments and administration of medications. Hall's concept includes adult patients who have passed the acute stage of illness and have rehabilitation and feelings of self-actualization as their goal.
References in classic literature ?
Miss Oranthy Bluggage, the accomplished strong-minded lecturer, will deliver her famous lecture on "WOMAN AND HER POSITION" at Pickwick Hall, next Saturday Evening, after the usual performances.
Cabbages grew in plain sight; and a pumpkin-vine, rooted at some distance, had run across the intervening space, and deposited one of its gigantic products directly beneath the hall window, as if to warn the Governor that this great lump of vegetable gold was as rich an ornament as New England earth would offer him.
He wants to go to a music hall to see a trained ape," said the mother, looking warningly at her husband.
His stern face could not stay little Violet, and on through the long hall she went, heedless of the snow that gathered on her feet, and the bleak wind that blew around her; while the King with wondering eyes looked on the golden light that played upon the dark walls as she passed.
He alighted from the chariot, and taking Proserpina in his arms, carried her up a lofty flight of steps into the great hall of the palace.
To the banquet hall he went, knowing that his chiefs awaited him there and as he entered they arose and upon the faces of many were incredulity and amaze, for they had not thought to see O-Tar the jeddak again after what the spies had told them of the horrid sounds issuing from the chamber of O-Mai.
he cried, and, turning directly to Roger de Leybourn, "I have no quarrel with thee, My Lord; but again I come for a guest within thy halls.
And then away she flew, and Kay sat quite alone in the empty halls of ice that were miles long, and looked at the blocks of ice, and thought and thought till his skull was almost cracked.
Christie's only reply to this levity was a look of superior resignation as she crossed the hall and entered the parlor.
Your master himself may be beyond the British Channel, for aught you know: and then, if he is at Thornfield Hall, towards which you hasten, who besides him is there?
She waited, looking through the open doorway opposite, down the wilderness of the dismantled Hall.
A pole was set up at the front of the hall, supporting the end of a telegraph wire that ran from Salem to Boston.