Hall


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Hall

 [hawl]
Lydia E. (1906–1969) founder and first director of the Loeb Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. Her work as a researcher and consultant at the New York Heart Association and as project director of nursing and long-term illnesses for the Division of Chronic Illnesses and Tuberculosis of the U.S. Public Health Service led her to believe that the nurse-patient relationship is therapeutic in itself and that the chief need of the chronically ill patient is professional nursing care. The establishment of the Loeb Center, providing professional nursing care in an institutional setting, enabled her to put her theories into practice.

Hall, Lydia E

(1906-1969), a nursing theorist who presented her Care, Core, and Cure Model in "Nursing: What Is It?" in The Canadian Nurse (1964). Hall believed that nursing functions differently in three overlapping circles that constitute aspects of patients. She labeled the circles the body (the care), the disease (the cure), and the person (the core). Hall viewed nursing in relation to the core aspect as concerned with the therapeutic use of self in communicating with the patient. Care is the nurturing, comforting component, the "hands-on" care of the patient. Cure is the aspect of nursing involved with treatments and administration of medications. Hall's concept includes adult patients who have passed the acute stage of illness and have rehabilitation and feelings of self-actualization as their goal.
References in classic literature ?
He broke off acquaintance with all the gentry, and shut himself up like a hermit at the Hall.
As the final number passed her lips at the third time of counting, she crossed the Hall.
From his musing, Cedric was suddenly awakened by the blast of a born, which was replied to by the clamorous yells and barking of all the dogs in the hall, and some twenty or thirty which were quartered in other parts of the building.
On entering the hall with the four-and-twenty windows, with their rubies, diamonds, and emeralds, he cried:
residence at Baskerville Hall, and it is common talk how
It was clear, from the moment of his rising, that he had a number of friends and sympathizers in the hall, though they formed a minority in the audience.
Holmes and I glanced at each other, and Hall Pycroft took a step towards the table.
It was a sad and sombre party that sat at the feast of welcome in the great dining hall of the palace of the Prince of Helium that day.
Forgive me if I have spoken strongly;" and he paced his hall for a little in an agitation which made me like him better and better.
It was no easy matter on that day, to force one's way into that grand hall, although it was then reputed to be the largest covered enclosure in the world (it is true that Sauval had not yet measured the grand hall of the Château of Montargis).
There came, too, longer and longer descriptions of the smashing up of the City Hall and the Navy Yard, and people began to realise faintly what those brief minutes of uproar had meant.
My friend," said Anna Mikhaylovna in gentle tones, addressing the hall porter, I know Count Cyril Vladimirovich is very ill.