halide

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Related to Halides: List of Halides

halide

 [hal´īd]
a compound of a halogen with an element or radical.

hal·ide

(hal'īd),
A salt of a halogen.

hal·ide

(hal'īd)
A salt of a halogen.

halide

a compound of a halogen with an element or radical.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other major change is the elimination of the qualitative halide test; this can significantly affect the halide content portion of the designation for a large number of fluxes.
The CFL bulbs were selected to replace existing metal halide fixtures based on lighting levels needed, ROI, retrofit options available, and also site and project schedules.
Generally, three different concentrations of halides were introduced to the acid solution: 1 x [10.
Plants and microbes produce methyl halides naturally, but in amounts too small for commercial use.
Although halogens are sometimes included in fluxes, halides are the compounds most commonly associated with them.
The 15-year-old building's high bay metal halide ceiling lights were having a hard time getting the job done.
The emulsion layer of your film contains many silver halide crystals both above and below the surface of the emulsion.
Laboratory tests have revealed for the first time that certain types of common fungi can produce ozone-destroying methyl halide gases.
Tekmar-Dohrmann's DX-2000 Total Organic Halide Analyzer uses carbon absorption, oxidative combustion and coulometric titration to detect organic halides.
Methyl halide compounds include methyl chloride, methyl bromide and methyl iodide, which become reactive agents when released into the atmosphere.
In addition to producing the superior white light, metal halide lamps are compact, long lived, and energy efficient.
Metal halides produce up to 125 lumens per watt compared to 39 lumens per watt with fluorescents and 18 lumens per watt for standard incandescent bulbs.