Hakomi body-oriented psychotherapy

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Hakomi body-oriented psychotherapy

A Reichian-based therapeutic system that combines Eastern philosophies (Buddhism, Taoism, meditation, mindfulness, and nonviolence) with Western body-oriented psychotherapy, bioenergetics, Feldenkreis method, Gestalt therapy, neurolinguistic programming, structural bodywork and others. Hakomi therapists attempt to return the client to unpleasant childhood memories, examine the experience and find strategies for new attitudes and behaviour.
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Body Centered Psychotherapy: The Hakomi method: The integrated use of mindfulness, nonviolence, and the body.
Ron Kurtz, originator of the Hakomi psychotherapy modality, calls them nourishment barriers (Benz & Weiss, 1989, p.
Trauma Touch Therapy[TM], Hakomi Integrative Somatics[TM], Hellerwork, and Somatic Experiencing[R] are among the modalities that utilize touch/massage, breathwork, and/or movement to facilitate trauma resolution.
ACT (Callaghan & colleagues; Pankey; Schoendorff & colleague); Hakomi (Collis); Mindfulness (Bowen & colleagues); Behavioral Activation (McClafferty); EST for PTSD (Pederson & colleagues); ACT, CBT, Behavioral Activation, EST for Smoking (Holmanl & colleagues); ESTs for Sexual Offense Behavior (Newring & colleagues).
The technique that will be outlined in this paper comes from the Hakomi Method.
Hakomi is a mindfulness based, body inclusive form of psychotherapy developed by Ron Kurtz in the mid 1970's (Kurtz, 1990).
A HAKOMI TECHNIQUE ADAPTED FOR FAP (ADAPTED FROM KURTZ, 1990 AND FISHER, 2002)
One of a broad range of techniques used in Hakomi is a form of verbal experiment generally referred to as a 'probe' or sometimes more pleasantly as an 'offering' (Cole & Ladas-Gaskin, 2007).
Hakomi advocates for avoiding using a first person statement as they do not focus on generating transference as part of the treatment (Kurtz, 1990).
Resistance is called a "nourishment barrier" in Ron Kurtz's Hakomi modality (Whitehead, 1994, p.