hemotoxin

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hemotoxin

 [he´mo-tok″sin]
an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin),
Any substance that causes destruction of red blood cells, including various hemolysins; usually used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): hematotoxin, hematoxin

hemotoxin

/he·mo·tox·in/ (-tok″sin) an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin)
Any substance that destroys red blood cells, including various hemolysins; usually used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): hematotoxin, haemotoxin.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin)
Any substance that destroys red blood cells; used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): haemotoxin.

hemotoxin

an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
We did not manage any purely neurotoxic or haemotoxic bites.
Indications for antivenom administration [1] Cytotoxic (PPS) Neurotoxic Haemotoxic (bleeding) (progressive weakness) Swelling extending at Pins and needles, Fang punctures do not 15 cm or more for 1 profuse sweating, and stop bleeding and/or hour excessive salivation severe headaches, (or metallic taste) dizziness, fainting Swelling to the elbow after mamba or convulsions or knee by 3-4 hours envenomation Swelling of a whole Shortness of breath Active systemic limb within 8 hours due to weakness in bleeding (not the absence of PPS bruising of the Swelling threatening bitten limb alone) the airway Inability to swallow saliva Non-clotting blood Associated after 20 minutes in unexplained shortness Generalised weakness an undisturbed, new, of breath in the presence of dry, clean test tube.
In this series of cases majority of the bites were neurotoxic (71%) compared to the published data from elsewhere, documenting haemotoxic bites to be common in children.
Among children with snake envenomation, 71% were neurotoxic, 69% had local envenomation and 17% had haemotoxic envenomation.
36% of children with neurotoxic envenomation, 54% with local envenomation and 16% with haemotoxic envenomation required surgical intervention.
The predominant pattern of envenomation includes cellulitis in 48%, haemotoxic 27%, neurotoxic 22%, and both haemo and neurotoxic in 17% of the patients.
Identification of type of snake and the time of bite plays a crucial role in determining the progression of impending complications of snakebite like neurotoxic and haemotoxic effects.
Snakebites are usually categorised according to the primary action of their venom into cytotoxic, haemotoxic and neurotoxic.
AIM OF THE STUDY: Study of clinical manifestation and complications of haemotoxic snake envenomation.
The onset of complications in haemotoxic envenomation, and time onset depends upon the factors like the severity of envenomation the time onset of sero therapy.