habituation

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habituation

 [hah-bich″u-a´shun]
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3. older term denoting sometimes tolerance and other times a psychological dependence resulting from the repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(ha-bit'chū-ā'shŭn),
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation

/ha·bit·u·a·tion/ (hah-bich″u-a´shun)
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment, with a decreasing response.
2. an older term denoting sometimes tolerance and sometimes a psychological dependence due to repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.

habituation

(hə-bĭch′o͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The process of habituating or the state of being habituated.
2. Physiological tolerance to a drug resulting from repeated use.
3. Psychology The decline in responsiveness to a stimulus due to repeated exposure.

habituation

[həbich′o̅o̅·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, habituare, to become used to
1 an acquired tolerance gained by repeated exposure to a particular stimulus such as alcohol.
2 a decline and eventual elimination of a conditioned response by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3 psychological and emotional dependence on a drug, tobacco, or alcohol that results from the repeated use of the substance but without the addictive, physiological need to increase dosage. Also called negative adaptation. Compare addiction.
4 internal readiness to demonstrate a consistent pattern of behavior guided by habits and roles; this readiness is associated with specific temporal, physical, or social environments.

habituation

Psychology An adaptive response characterized by a ↓ reactivity to a repeated stimulus–eg, a substance of abuse or repeated electrical stimulation of a nerve

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation

The development of a tolerance or dependence by repetition or prolonged exposure. From the Latin habituare , to bring into a condition.

habituation

the progressive loss of a behavioural response as a result of continued stimulation.

habituation

the reduction in the strength or frequency of a response to a stimulus due to repeated exposure to the stimulus.

habituation

reduction of a desired drug response, or the need for greater dose to achieve the early response, due to repeated use of the drug

habituation,

n the process of decreased response to repeated stimulation.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. Process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. Method by which nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation,

n a state in which an individual involuntarily tends to continue the use of a drug. Generally refers to the state in which an individual continues self-administration of a drug because of psychologic dependence without physical dependence.
Haemophilus
n a genus of gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, frequently found in the respiratory tract of humans and other animals.
Haemophilus are generally sensitive to cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and sulfonamides.
H. influenzae,
n a small, gram-negative, nonmotile, parasitic bacterium that occurs in two forms, encapsulated and nonencapsulted, and in six types: A, B, C, D, E, and F. Almost all infections are caused by the encapsulated type B organisms. It is found in the throats of 30% of healthy, normal people. It may cause destructive inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi in children and debilitated older people.

habituation

1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus; called also negative adaptation.