habilitation

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habilitation

 [hah-bil″ĭ-ta´shun]
the assisting of a child with achieving developmental skills when impairments have caused delaying or blocking of initial acquisition of the skills. Habilitation can include cognitive, social, fine motor, gross motor, or other skills that contribute to mobility, communication, and performance of activities of daily living and enhance quality of life.

habilitation

[həbil′itā′shən]
the process of supplying a person with the means to develop maximum independence in activities of daily living through training, education, and/or treatment.

ha·bil·i·ta·tion

(hă-bili-tāshŭn)
Educating people with functional limitations so that they can live in society more easily.

habilitation

Training of the disabled in needed skills.

habilitation,

References in periodicals archive ?
HANSEN, The radiosity equation on certain spaces of continuous functions and its numerical solution, Habilitationschrift, Fachbereichs Mathematik, der Johannes Gutenberg-Universitt Mainz, 2001.
In this revised version of his 1997 Habilitationschrift, Ulrich confronts the scholarly assumption that Eusebius of Caesarea was an "anti-Jewish" theologian (1-3).
For eighteen months she served as Husserl's private assistant while completing a second dissertation, her habilitationschrift, Potenz und Akt.
This Habilitationschrift written under Otto Wernelinger both enjoys the advantages and suffers the disadvantages of the genre.
The concluding chapter to Heidegger's Habilitationschrift, on medieval semantics began by citing Novalis: "We seek everywhere the unconditioned (das Unbedingte) and only ever find conditioned things (Dinge).
The original title of this revised Habilitationschrift indicates more fully the book's character: "The Language and Theology of Immanence in the Corpus Johanneum: History-of-Religions and Theological Investigations.
Jan Aertsen, under whose direction the present volume first appeared at the Thomas Institut in Koln as its author's Habilitationschrift.
Originally a Habilitationschrift entitled Weltangst und Weltende (1987), this work offers a theology of anxiety caused by the expectation of the end of the world.
Theodore Kisiel's treatment of the Habilitationschrift is almost impenetrably dense but brilliant.