Haber-Weiss reaction


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Ha·ber-Weiss re·ac·tion

(hah'bēr wīs),
the reaction of superoxide (O2·-) with hydrogen peroxide to produce molecular oxygen (O2), hydroxide radical (OH·), and OH-; often, iron-catalyzed; a source of oxidative stress in blood cells and various tissues.
[F. Haber, J. J. Weiss]

Haber-Weiss reaction

(hob′ĕr-vīs′)
[Fritz Haber, Ger. physical chemist, 1868–1934; Joseph Weiss, Haber's student]
The generation of toxic oxygen and hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide and superoxide. These radicals contribute to cell injury in many diseases, e.g., in the brain or heart after a stroke or heart attack.
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5) Copper is toxic in its unbound form, causes redox imbalance due to its highly redox active nature, which leads to activation of stress sensitive intracellular signaling pathways through Haber-Weiss reaction (6,7) The present study was undertaken to study the relationship between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and copper with ceruloplasmin in type 2 DM patients
Hydroxyl radical is also formed in the Haber-Weiss reaction with the participation of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and ferrous cation [10]:
Reaction 7 is the Haber-Weiss reaction, which supports the notion that transition metals play an important role in the formation of hydroxyl radicals.
2] may not cause DNA damage under physiologic conditions, it participates in the metal ion-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction and generates the highly reactive *OH, which can target DNA, resulting in oxidative DNA damage (42).
However, it can be reduced to the active Fe2+, depending on condition, particularly pH [29] and oxidized back through Fenton type reactions with the production of hydroxyl radical or Haber-Weiss reactions with superoxide anions.