HPV vaccine


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HPV vaccine

A vaccine that protects against several types of human papillomavirus infection, specifically those associated with genital warts and cervical cancer.
See also: vaccine
References in periodicals archive ?
HPV vaccine coverage with at least one dose was highest in central cities (66%) and lowest among adolescents in nonmetropolitan areas (50%).
The HPV vaccine is a treatment in widespread use but its efficacy in preventing cancer is medically unproven, while unintended, adverse reactions are blighting and even ending the lives of girls and young women across the world," IRF Films, a company helmed by Immunity Resource Foundation, (https://www.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends that 11- to 12-year-olds get two doses of the HPV vaccine, rather than three, with the second dose given 6-12 months after the first (MMWR.
are in a unique position to reach out to their pediatric counterparts and discuss strategies for catching more patients eligible for the HPV vaccine, said Sarah Dilley, MD, a gynecologic oncology fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the lead author of the recent Call to Action paper.
Unfortunately, our colleagues delivering preventive care to young teens have persisted in considering the HPV vaccine as an optional adjunct to routine vaccination despite the advice of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which for many years has recommended the HPV vaccine for girls.
Moreover, the majority of these deaths can be prevented in developing nations, provided the health professionals are adequately and periodically sensitised about the HPV vaccine so that they can educate and improve the acceptance of HPV vaccine among the general population.
The prelicensure HPV vaccine efficacy trials were conducted with 3-dose series; post hoc analyses conducted with data from some of these trials found high efficacy against infection among vaccinees who received 2 doses and those who received 3 doses (9,10).
However, the HPV vaccine is not meant to replace cervical cancer screening.
The spokesman said: "The HPV vaccine is safe and protects girls and women from developing certain cancers associated with the human papilloma virus.
At first glance, this might seem like a serious disadvantage, because the HPV vaccine cannot simply be incorporated into other vaccine initiatives.
Fifty-six percent of study participants were unvaccinated, and 44 percent had received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine before being screened for cervical cancer.