HCN2

HCN2

A gene on chromosome 19p13.3 that encodes a hyperpolarisation-activated cation channels of the HCN gene family, which contributes to spontaneous rhythmic activity in both heart and brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is exciting about the work on the HCN2 gene is that removing it -- or blocking it pharmacologically -- eliminates neuropathic pain without affecting normal acute pain," McNaughton said in a statement about this work.
They also found that deleting HCN2 appeared to have no effect on normal acute pain -- such as the type of pain caused by accidentally cutting yourself or biting your own tongue -- a factor they said was important since this type of pain acts as a useful warning signal to the body.
For the study, published in the journal Science, the researchers engineered the removal of the HCN2 gene from pain-sensitive nerves and then used electrical stimuli on these nerves in lab dishes to find out how the nerves had been changed by the removal of HCN2.
The scientists then studied genetically modified mice in which the HCN2 gene had been deleted.
Scientists have known about the HCN2 gene, which is found in pain-sensitive nerve endings, for several years, but had not yet fully understood its role in regulating pain.
Summary: British scientists have identified a gene responsible for regulating chronic pain, called HCN2, and say their discovery should help drug researchers in their search for more effective, targeted pain-killing medicines.
Interestingly, researchers also found that deleting HCN2 does not affect normal acute pain (the type of pain produced by a sudden injury- such as biting one's tongue).
University of Cambridge researchers have isolated a gene called HCN2, which produces a protein that causes chronic pain.
Our research lays the groundwork for the development of new drugs to treat chronic pain by blocking HCN2," said lead researcher Professor Peter McNaughton, Head of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Cambridge, said.
The researchers engineered the removal of the HCN2 gene from pain-sensitive nerves and then carried out studies using electrical stimuli on these nerves in cell cultures to determine how their properties were altered by the removal of HCN2.
Following promising results from the in vitro studies in cell cultures, the researchers studied genetically modified mice in which the HCN2 gene had been deleted.