HCAI


Also found in: Acronyms.

HCAI

Abbreviation for:
healthcare-acquired infection
healthcare-associated infection, see there
References in periodicals archive ?
HCAIs effects include extended hospital stay, long-term disability, enhanced resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobials, huge added financial load, high costs for patients and their families, and increased number of deaths.
risks, costs, and benefits) were incorporated into the scenarios of the HCAI.
We are dedicated to helping customers reduce HCAIs and believe that this collaboration will provide healthcare institutions with actionable information on hygiene which will ultimately result in improved health care," Chidichimo added.
The training on hand hygiene focused on: background to WHO Patient Safety and the First Global Patient Safety Challenge; definition, effect and burden of HCAI; major patterns of transmission of health care-associated pathogens, with a particular focus on hand transmission; prevention of HCAI and the critical role of hand hygiene; WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care and their implementation strategy and tools, including why, when and how to perform hand hygiene in health care.
5) Several effective evidence-based interventions have demonstrated the role of hand hygiene in reducing the occurrence of HCAI.
Have and adhere to appropriate policies and protocols for the prevention and control of HCAI.
Infection control conference took place in Prague March 20-21, 2006 and featured 15 speakers covering many aspects of infection control, ranging from the various emerging infections throughout the world, such as the Avian Flu, SARS, Ebola and HCAI and the critical role the nonwovens industry is playing in this field.
It found that there was between a nine per cent and ten per cent chance that people who were admitted into medical care in England would contract some form of HCAI.
HCAI recently announced completion of its divestiture of healthcare services.
Under these circumstances numerous viral and bacterial HCAI are transmitted and the burden due to such infections seems likely to be several times higher than what is observed in developed countries.
Dr Eleri Davies, of the National Public Health Service said: "These data give a snapshot of the numbers of HCAI occurring in hospitals in the UK and Ireland.