HA-1A

HA-1A

a genetically engineered antibody used in the treatment of gram-negative bacteremia and septic shock. The antibody binds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. It is relatively free of side effects.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The HA-1A monoclonal antibody and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) protein are intravenous treatments that can neutralize endotoxins and halt the cascade of inflammatory mediators that cause toxic shock and organ failure.
In a cohort of 130 patients with acute meningococcal infections given the HA-1A monoclonal antibody there were 24 deaths, compared with 37 deaths among the 137 placebo-treated patients.
The HA-1A monoclonal antibody and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) protein both are early intervention intravenous treatments that can neutralize endotoxins and interrupt the cascade of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that cause toxic shock and organ failure.
In a cohort of 130 patients with acute meningococcal infections given the HA-1A monoclonal antibody, there were 24 deaths, compared with 37 deaths among the 137 placebo-treated patients.
In April, the FDA announced it would not allow Centocor's drug, called HA-1A, on the market, even though an expert panel convented last September to advise the agency recommended approving the drug.
The FDA rejected the results of two clinical trials of HA-1A sponsored by Centocor on grounds that the company took an early look at the preliminary results and changed the ground rules of the trials in midstream in a way that could have made the drug appear more effective.
But while Centocor and Xoma attempt to convince the FDA of the merits of HA-1A and E5, they and several other companies are also developing newer, "second-generation" drugs against sepsis.
A committee of outside experts convened by the Food and Drug Administration has endorsed a human antibody, HA-1A, for the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections.
makes HA-1A by culturing genetically engineered human cells in the laboratory.
The new drug, called HA-1A, consists of antibodies produced by laboratory-reared human cells isolated nearly a decade ago by researchers at Stanford University and the University of California, San Diego.
In its first large-scale human tests, HA-1A seems to have worked exactly as it should.
In the 200 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, infection-related mortality was 39 percent lower among those receiving HA-1A than among those on placebo.