H041

H041

A recently identified strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacteria that causes gonorrhoea, which is extremely resistant to cephalosporins (which are the last family of antibiotics still effective in treating gonorrhea).
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To the Editor: In 2009, 2010, and 2013, Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains H041 (ceftriaxone MIC of 2 mg/L), F89 (ceftriaxone MIC of 1 mg/L), and A8806 (ceftriaxone MIC of 0.
MLST assigned strain GU140106 to sequence type 7363, the same as strains H041 and A8806 (1,2).
The A8806 strain shares some genetic similarities with H041, another antibiotic-resistant strain of gonorrhea discovered in 2009 in a Japanese sex worker.
Thus far, only a handful of cases of the new, super-resistant strain have been found in Japan, but H041 is expected to spread and displace other strains.
The Japanese superbug, called H041, was isolated by Magnus Unemo at the orebro University Hospital in Sweden and reported this week in the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research meeting in Quebec, Canada.
Experts are battling to discover a way of killing the new strain of the sexually transmitted infection, called H041.
Dr Magnus Unemo, who led the research team that discovered H041 in Japan, described the findings as "alarming".
The strain is being classified as: Gonorrhea strain H041.
For this strain, named H041, MIC of ceftriaxone was high (2 [micro]g/mL), and the strain was highly resistant to penicillin G (4 [micro]g/ mL), cefixime (8 [micro]g/mL), and levofloxacin (32 [micro]g/mL).
NG-MAST indicated that the strain H041 was ST4220 and contained the por2594 allele and the tbpB10 allele.
Experts yesterday announced they are battling to discover a way of killing the new strain of the sexually transmitted infection, called H041.
First discovered in Japan, the H041 strain is resistant to the class of antibiotics, called cephalosporins, commonly used to treat the STD.