Histoplasma capsulatum

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His·to·plas·ma cap·su·la·tum

(his'tō-plaz'mă kap'sū-lā'tŭm),
A dimorphic fungus species of worldwide distribution that causes histoplasmosis in humans and other mammals; its ascomycetous state is Ajellomyces capsulatum. The organism's natural habitat is soil fertilized with bird and bat droppings, where it grows as a mold, fragments of which, following inhalation, produce the primary pulmonary infection; within the mammalian host tissues, inhaled mycelial fragments grow as uninuclear yeasts that reproduce by budding. This parasitic form may also be induced in the laboratory by culturing the mycelial phase at 37°C on a blood-enriched medium; growth reverts to the mycelial form when the temperature is below 37°C. Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii causes a clinically distinct disease, African histoplasmosis, in which large yeast cells with thicker walls are found in tissues, in contrast to the small yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum var. farciminosum, which causes epizootic lymphangitis.
[histo- + G. plasma, something formed]

Histoplasma capsulatum

Etymology: Gk, histos + plasma + L, capsula, little box
a dimorphic fungal organism that is a single budding yeast at body temperature and a mold at room temperature. It is the causative organism in histoplasmosis, common in the Mississippi River Valley. The fungus, spread by airborne spores from soil contaminated with excreta from birds or infected bats, acts as a parasite on the cells of the reticuloendothelial system. See also histoplasmosis.

His·to·plas·ma cap·su·la·tum

(his'tō-plaz'mă kap-sū-lā'tŭm)
A dimorphic fungus species that causes histoplasmosis; its ascomycetous state is Ajellomyces capsulatum. The organism's natural habitat is soil fertilized with bird and bat droppings, where it grows as a mold, fragments of which, following inhalation, produce the primary pulmonary infection; within the mammalian host, inhaled mycelial fragments grow as uninuclear yeasts that reproduce by budding. H. capsulatum is encountered primarily in Africa and in North America.
[histo- + G. plasma, something formed]

Histoplasma

a genus of fungi belonging to the phylum Ascomycota.

Histoplasma capsulatum
a species of pathogenic fungi that cause histoplasmosis. The fungi appear in tissues as small, single oval bodies.
Histoplasma capsulatum var. farciminosum
phylogenically diverse fungi within the species H. capsulatum. Called also H. farciminosum. Causes epizootic lymphangitis of horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
When considering a diagnosis of histoplasmosis, providers should also consider testing with urine EIA, a noninvasive way to assess the presence of H.
double dagger]) One patient with a culture positive for Histoplasma capsulatum also had histopathology and urine enzyme immunoassay results consistent with H.
Immediately after capture, the bats were euthanized by an overdose of diethyl ether by inhalation, and their spleen, liver, and lungs were analyzed for H.
None of the homogenates showed positive reactions in H.
Direct examination of the lymph node showed numerous yeasts with a typical lemon shape and a narrow budding, suggestive of H.
Direct examination of a skin biopsy specimen showed large, lemon-shaped yeasts suggestive of H.
Patients receiving immunosuppressive agents are also predisposed to H.
The microorganism was subsequently identified as H.
Of the remaining 4 co-workers screened for clinical and exposure information, 1 reported onset of respiratory illness at the same time as the case-patients although all had negative H.
El suelo y el aire constituyen el habitat natural del hongo, que abunda especialmente en lugares enriquecidos con heces de animales domesticos y silvestres, como aves y murcielagos, existiendo una asociacion caracteristica entre infeccion por H.
Bird or bat guano and rotting wood are classic reservoirs for H.