H colony

H col·o·ny

a colony of motile organisms forming a thin film of growth. Compare: O colony.
[Ger. Hauch, breath]
References in classic literature ?
The daguerreotypist had found these beans in a garret, over one of the seven gables, treasured up in an old chest of drawers by some horticultural Pyncheon of days gone by, who doubtless meant to sow them the next summer, but was himself first sown in Death's garden-ground.
Bordering this path, in a broken, uneven line, are the villa residences of modern Aldborough -- fanciful little houses, standing mostly in their own gardens, and possessing here and there, as horticultural ornaments, staring figure- heads of ships doing duty for statues among the flowers.
I made a point of spending as much time as possible in the garden, to justify the picture I had originally given of my horticultural passion.
He raised a certain building in his court-yard by a story, which shutting out the sun, took half a degree of warmth from Boxtel's garden, and, on the other hand, added half a degree of cold in winter; not to mention that it cut the wind, and disturbed all the horticultural calculations and arrangements of his neighbour.
I have seen great surprise expressed in horticultural works at the wonderful skill of gardeners, in having produced such splendid results from such poor materials; but the art, I cannot doubt, has been simple, and, as far as the final result is concerned, has been followed almost unconsciously.
The bills for my roses and bulbs and other last year's horticultural indulgences were all on the table when I came down to breakfast this morning.
And some day or other (but it will be after our time, thank goodness) Hyde Park Gardens will be no better known than the celebrated horticultural outskirts of Babylon, and Belgrave Square will be as desolate as Baker Street, or Tadmor in the wilderness.