ROM

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range

 [rānj]
1. the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values.
2. an interval in which values sampled from a population, or the values in the population itself, are known to lie.
range of accommodation the total amount of accommodative power of the eye; the difference in refractive power of the eye when adjusted for near and for far vision. The amplitude diminishes as age increases because elasticity of the lens is decreased.
range of audibility the range between the extreme frequencies of sound waves beyond which the human ear perceives no sound: lower limit, 16 to 20 cycles per second; upper limit, 18,000 to 20,000 cycles per second.
range of motion the range, measured in degrees of a circle, through which a joint can be extended and flexed; see also range of motion exercises.

ROM

1 abbreviation for range of motion.
2 abbreviation for read-only memory.
3 abbreviation for rupture of membranes.
4 abbreviation for right otitis media.

ROM

Gynecology Rupture of membranes. See Premature rupture of membranes Orthopedics Range of motion The arc of a joint's movement, potentially limited by musculoskeletal defects.

ROM

Abbreviation for range of motion.

Range of motion (ROM)

The range of motion of a joint from full extension to full flexion (bending) measured in degrees like a circle.
Mentioned in: Spinal Cord Injury

ROM

range of movement

ROM,

n.pr See Respiratory One Method.

ROM

Abbreviation for range of motion.
References in classic literature ?
He kept them fixed incessantly on the gypsy, and, while the giddy young girl of sixteen danced and whirled, for the pleasure of all, his revery seemed to become more and more sombre.
It was that of the bald man, who never removed his eyes from the gypsy.
However, this cry, which alarmed the gypsy, delighted a troop of children who were prowling about there.
And the old invisible kill-joy might have had occasion to repent of her aggressions against the gypsy had their attention not been diverted at this moment by the procession of the Pope of the Fools, which, after having traversed many streets and squares, debouched on the Place de Grève, with all its torches and all its uproar.
He's not there himself, so you'll have to go in and ask the princesses; and from there go on to the Rasgulyay- the coachman Ipatka knows- and look up the gypsy Ilyushka, the one who danced at Count Orlov's, you remember, in a white Cossack coat, and bring him along to me.
About a tousand or two tousand year ago, me cannot tell to a year or two, as can neider write nor read, dere was a great what you call--a volution among de gypsy; for dere was de lord gypsy in dose days; and dese lord did quarrel vid one anoder about de place; but de king of de gypsy did demolish dem all, and made all his subject equal vid each oder; and since dat time dey have agree very well; for dey no tink of being king, and may be it be better for dem as dey be; for me assure you it be ver troublesome ting to be king, and always to do justice; me have often wish to be de private gypsy when me have been forced to punish my dear friend and relation; for dough we never put to death, our punishments be ver severe.
Now, when they were alone together in a remote part of the barn, whether it proceeded from the strong liquor, which is never so apt to inflame inordinate desire as after moderate fatigue; or whether the fair gypsy herself threw aside the delicacy and decency of her sex, and tempted the youth Partridge with express solicitations; but they were discovered in a very improper manner by the husband of the gypsy, who, from jealousy it seems, had kept a watchful eye over his wife, and had dogged her to the place, where he found her in the arms of her gallant.
His Egyptian majesty then addressed himself to the husband as follows: "Me be sorry to see any gypsy dat have no more honour dan to sell de honour of his wife for money.
That was by no means a new idea to Maggie; she had been so often told she was like a gypsy, and "half wild," that when she was miserable it seemed to her the only way of escaping opprobrium, and being entirely in harmony with circumstances, would be to live in a little brown tent on the commons; the gypsies, she considered, would gladly receive her and pay her much respect on account of her superior knowledge.
But it was startling to find the gypsies in a lane, after all, and not on a common; indeed, it was rather disappointing; for a mysterious illimitable common, where there were sand-pits to hide in, and one was out of everybody's reach, had always made part of Maggie's picture of gypsy life.
An old gypsy woman was seated on the ground nursing her knees, and occasionally poking a skewer into the round kettle that sent forth an odorous steam; two small shock-headed children were lying prone and resting on their elbows something like small sphinxes; and a placid donkey was bending his head over a tall girl, who, lying on her back, was scratching his nose and indulging him with a bite of excellent stolen hay.
I'm come from home because I'm unhappy, and I mean to be a gypsy.