Gymnodinium


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Gymnodinium

(jim'nō-din'ē-ŭm),
Genus of marine dinoflagellates that includes the unicellular organism that causes red tide.

Gymnodinium

/Gym·no·din·i·um/ (jim″no-din´e-um) a genus of dinoflagellates, most species of which have many colored chromatophores, found in water; when present in great numbers, they help to form the destructive red tide in the ocean.

Gym·no·din·i·um

(jim-nŏ-din'ē-um)
Genus of marine dinoflagellates that includes the unicellular organism that causes red tide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pyrrhoxanthin (122) was isolated for the first time from the marine dinoflagellate Gyrodinium resplendens (Loeblich and Smith 1968), from the photosynthetic dinoflagellates Amphidinium carterae (2 strains), Glenodinium, Gymnodinium splendens, Gymnodinium nelsoni, and Gyrodinium dorsum (Johansen et al.
A pilot study to explore the occupational exposure to Gymnodinium brevetoxin and pulmonary function.
These phytoplankton species, like cochlodinium polykriokoides, gymnodinium catenatum and pseudo-nitzschia, are sub-tropical and warm temperate species that are normally found in areas such as the Gulf of Mexico and Korea.
Balech (1974) used differences in the number and shape of cingular plates to separate Protoperidinium from Peridinium, and other taxa first described as species of Peridinium have been moved to other genera including Gymnodinium, Gonyaulax, Ceratium, irhompsodinium and Glochidinium based on differences from the plate pattern of P.
Monitoring brevetoxins during a Gymnodinium breve red tide: comparison of sodium channel specific cytotoxicity assay and mouse bioassay for determination of neurotoxic shellfish toxins in shell-fish extracts.
Other toxins that have been proven to be deactivated by ozone treatment are Clostridium botulinum (botulism) and Gymnodinium breve that is one of the red tide toxins (9).
A monoclonal antibody which recognizes the cell surface of red tide alga Gymnodinium nagasakiense.
STEROLS AS BIOMARKERS IN GYMNODINIUM BREVE: DISTRIBUTION IN DINOFLAGELLATES.
Brevetoxin, produced by the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve, killed approximately 150 Florida manatee, another endangered species, in 1996 (Bossart et al 1998), and was likely the cause for a smaller die-off in 1982 (O'Shea et al.