catgut

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gut

 [gut]
2. the primordial digestive tube, consisting of the foregut, midgut, and hindgut.
chromic gut (chromicized gut) surgical gut treated with a chromic salt to increase its resistance to absorption in tissues.
surgical gut an absorbable sterile strand prepared from collagen derived from healthy mammals, used for absorbable sutures. It was originally prepared from the submucous layer of the intestines of sheep. Called also catgut.

cat·gut

(kat'gŭt),
An absorbable surgical suture material made from the collagenous fibers of the submucosa of certain animals (for example, sheep or cows); misnamed catgut.
[probably from kit, a small violin, through confusion with kit, a small cat]

catgut

/cat·gut/ (kat´gut) surgical gut.

catgut

(kăt′gŭt′)
n.
A tough thin cord made from the treated and stretched intestines of certain animals, especially sheep, and used for stringing musical instruments and tennis rackets and for surgical ligatures.

catgut

Etymology: L, catta + AS, guttas
an absorbable suture material, prepared from the intestines of mammals, used to close surgical wounds. It can be treated with chromic salts to delay absorption and enhance strength.
An absorbable suture material from the submucosa of bovine intestine

catgut

Surgery An absorbable suture material from the submucosa of bovine intestine. Cf Silk.

cat·gut

(kat'gŭt)
An absorbable surgical suture material made from the collagenous fibers of the submucosa of certain animals, usually sheep or cows.
[probably from kit, a small violin, through confusion with kit, a small cat]

catgut

Twisted strips of COLLAGEN prepared from sheep intestine and used as surgical stitches (SUTURES) and ties (LIGATURES). Catgut is absorbable and need not be removed. Chromic catgut is processed chemically to retard the rate of absorption.

cat·gut

(kat'gŭt)
Absorbable surgical suture material made from the collagenous fibers of the submucosa of certain animals (e.g., sheep or cows); name is misnomer.
[probably from kit, a small violin, through confusion with kit, a small cat]

catgut,

n a sheep's intestine prepared as a suture and used for ligating vessels and closing soft tissue wounds.

catgut

an absorbable sterile strand derived from the intestinal submucosa of sheep and fixed in formalin, used as a surgical ligature and suture.

chromic catgut
treated with basic chromate salts; the suture does not absorb as much water as ordinary catgut and has a longer life and is stronger than the untreated product.
References in periodicals archive ?
Textures come up bright and clear under Francois-Xavier Roth's conducting of the sparky Les Siecles orchestra, with gut strings so strikingly forward -- and, paradoxically, liberating the winds, not least grunting bassoons, as well as roaring timpani and well-focused brass, to sound so immediate.
Crafted from materials such as seasoned pearwood and ebony, with real sheep gut strings, it took several months to make.
While he correctly argues that their use flies in the face of the extended neck's raison d'etre, namely to render low-pitched gut strings with enough length to give Umbral clarity, at the same time he overlooks modern circumstances that sometimes demand compromise.
Since then, orchestras have become louder with the phasing out of gut strings, and the introduction of wider bore wind instruments, so to use Mahler nowadays is really to gild the lily.
She performs on her cherished Jules Falk 1723 Stradivarius with gut strings and classical and Baroque bows.
Barrios, who had learned to play on metal strings, explained that he had resisted changing to gut strings (the standard for most classical performers) because he preferred the variety of unusual sounds and tonal effects he could produce on steel strings.
Gut strings speak slowly and the bow does not bite the same way a modern bow does, yet Manze attacks the instrument boldly, winning color and resonance to make the music seem less remote, less precious to modern ears.