gum


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gum

 [gum]
1. a mucilaginous excretion of various plants.
karaya gum (sterculia gum) see karaya gum.

gum

(gŭm),
1. The dried exuded sap from a number of trees and shrubs, forming an amorphous brittle mass; it usually forms a mucilaginous solution in water and is often used as a suspending agent in liquid preparations of insoluble drugs.
2. ☆ official atlternate term for gingiva
3. Water-soluble glycans, often containing uronic acids, found in many plants.

gum

(gum)
1. a mucilaginous excretion of various plants.

guar gum  a gum obtained from the ground endosperms of the leguminous tree Cyamopsis tetragonolobus; used in pharmaceutical preparations and as a source of soluble dietary fiber.
karaya gum , sterculia gum the dried gummy exudation from Sterculia species, which becomes gelatinous when moisture is added; used as a bulk laxative. It is also adhesive and is used in dental adhesives and skin adhesives and protective barriers around stomas.

gum 1

(gŭm)
n.
1.
a. Any of various viscous substances that are exuded by certain plants and trees and dry into water-soluble, noncrystalline, brittle solids.
b. A similar plant exudate, such as a resin.
c. Any of various adhesives made from such exudates or other sticky substance.
2. A substance resembling the viscous substance exuded by certain plants, as in stickiness.

gum 2

(gŭm)
n.
The firm connective tissue covered by mucous membrane that envelops the alveolar arches of the jaw and surrounds the bases of the teeth. Also called gingiva.
tr.v. gummed, gumming, gums
To chew (food) with toothless gums.

gum

1 a sticky excretion from certain plants.
2 a firm layer of flesh covering the alveolar processes of the jaws and the base of the teeth. See also gingiva.

gum

Herbal medicine
A tree from Africa that produces a resinous sap, which has been used for treating sore throat, coughs and diarrhoea.
 
Vox populi
See Chewing gum.

gum

Tobacco control See Nicotine gum.

gum

(gŭm)
1. The dried exuded sap from a variety of trees and shrubs, forming an amorphous brittle mass; usually forms a mucilaginous solution in water.
2. Synonym(s): gingiva.
[L. gummi]

GUM

Abbrev for genitourinary medicine. This specialty has absorbed and replaced the former discipline known as venereology.

gum

(gŭm)
1. Synonym(s): gingiva.
2. Dried exuded sap from various trees and shrubs, forming an amorphous brittle mass; usually forms a mucilaginous solution in water and is often used as a suspending agent in liquid preparations of insoluble drugs.
3. Water-soluble glycans, often containing uronic acids, found in many plants.
[L. gummi]

gum(s),

n the colloquial term for the fibrous and mucosal covering of the alveolar process or ridges or gingiva(e). See also gingiva.
gum pads,
n edentulous segments of the maxillae and mandible that correspond to the underlying primary teeth.

gum

1. a mucilaginous excretion of various plants.
2. see gingiva.

gum arabic
see acacia.
gum tragacanth

Patient discussion about gum

Q. What are the opportunities to restore gums? My gum on the lower jaw gets less and less, opening the roots of my teeth. Is there any technology or recurement to stop it and, hopefully, draw back?

A. Treatment of receding gums start with treating the cause - improving overall oral hygiene, including brushing habits (too powerful brushing may damage the gums), as well as periodic tooth cleaning at the dentist.

More sever situation may necessitate treatments done by a dentist. Consulting one may be wise.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/1136.htm

Q. Is it dangerous to swallow a bubble gum? My 4 year old child always swallows his chewing gum and I am worried that it can harm him

A. what about when your 45 yrs old and still swallowing gum? we had a debate with my older sister about this.

More discussions about gum
References in periodicals archive ?
Acacia Gum is 100% natural and vegetarian, free from pesticides and GMOs.
Sold at first to local markets, the gum became so popular that, within four years, Curtis & Son had built the world's first chewing gum factory, in Portland, Maine.
In an age where natural and clean labels are the recipe for success, gum ingredients can seem uncomfortably artificial.
For dental and medical professionals, who are the gatekeepers of their patients' health, the site includes tips for determining whether patients are at high risk for periodontal disease, the most advanced treatment options, the latest professional news about gum health ("Studies show a strong link between periodontal disease and Alzheimer's disease"), and straight answers to pros' questions about gum health ("What's the relationship between oral biofilm and treatment of gingivitis and periodontal disease?
Coventry taxpayers are currently forking out pounds 18,000 every year to have gum scraped or blasted from the city's streets, with each blob costing up to pounds 2 to clear.
Dingel said the biggest buyers of gum arabic were France and the United States, which has a range of sanctions on Sudan but which Dingel said made an exemption for gum arabic.
Alison Lowe, the Health Wales dental columnist said, "Chewing sugar-free gum soon after eating reduces the acid made by bacteria, which can cause tooth decay.
Pervaz Khan, Middlesbrough Council's executive councillor for Streetscene services, said: "Discarded gum is unsightly, unhygienic and a real nuisance.
Today, gum is a little more complicated, says Ron Ream, a food scientist in Plano, Ill.
They will be raising awareness of the new bins, the fixed penalties that will be issued to anyone caught dropping gum and the problems the council faces in removing it from the streets.
35% xanthan gum combination was higher than that of the WCS alone.