guinea worm

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guinea worm

n.
A nematode worm (Dracunculus medinensis) that is a parasite of humans in tropical Africa and formerly in Asia. Larvae are transmitted to humans when infected copepods are ingested in drinking water. The larvae develop in the body, and painful lesions occur when the mature female worms emerge gradually from the skin, usually of the lower legs.

guinea worm

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GUINEA WORM : Guinea worm being removed from ulcer

guinea worm

A nematode worm (Dracunculus medinensis) that is a parasite affecting subcutaneous tissues of humans and animals, found in tropical Africa and South Asia. The worm causes infection when its larvae are drunk in unfiltered or unsanitary water. The larvae enter the body through the stomach or duodenum, migrate through internal organs, and become adults. After mating, the adult female burrows to the subcutaneous tissue, often of the leg. The worm has been eradicated in Asia. See: Medina worm
See: illustration
See also: worm

Guinea worm

The parasitic worm Dracunculus medinensis . This occurs in many areas of tropical Africa and America. The worm is acquired by drinking water containing Cyclops water fleas that have ingested the worm larvae. The adult female worm, about 1 m long, settles under the skin and breaks through to release larvae, especially when the skin is in contact with water. She can be removed by winding her carefully out on a twig.

guinea worm

see dracunculusmedinensis.
References in periodicals archive ?
He has a broad interest in parasite life cycles and transmission dynamics and has been engaged in the Guinea worm eradication program since 1986.
dagger]) An indigenous case of dracunculiasis is defined as an infection consisting of a skin lesion or lesions with emergence of one or more Guinea worms in a person who had no history of travel outside his or her residential locality during the preceding year.
Murcott was passionate about bringing to Ghana technology that had been shown to reduce diarrhea, guinea worm, and other water-related diseases in an inexpensive and easy-to-use way.
lutrae is the species of Guinea worm that has only been found in river otters in Ontario, New York, and Michigan.
He has been engaged in the Guinea worm eradication program since 1986, and continues to work with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Carter Center, and the World Health Organization on the eradication program.
Although no cases were reported during the first 6 months of 2014, in the remainder of 2014, Mali's Guinea Worm Eradication Program reported 40 cases (88% contained) in three villages in nomadic localities: Tanzikratene (29 cases) in Gao region, Nanguaye (10) in Timbuktu region, and Fion (one) in Segou region.
such as trachoma, cholera, typhoid, Guinea Worm and schistosomiasis.
dagger]] An indigenous case of dracunculiasis is defined as an infection occurring in a person exhibiting a skin lesion or lesions with emergence of one or more Guinea worms in a person who had no history of travel outside his or her residential locality during the preceding year.
In 1986, the World Health Assembly (WHA) called for dracunculiasis elimination (1), and the global Guinea Worm Eradication Program, supported by The Carter Center, World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), CDC, and other partners, began assisting ministries of health of dracunculiasis-endemic countries in meeting this goal.
The South Sudan Guinea Worm Eradication Program (SSGWEP) reported 1,028 cases in 2011, of which 763 (74%) were contained (Table 1), which was a reduction of 39% from the 1,698 cases reported in 2010.
In each country affected by dracunculiasis, a national Guinea worm eradication program receives monthly reports of dracunculiasis ([section]) from every village with endemic transmission.
section] Dracunculiasis can be prevented by 1) filtering drinking water through a finely woven cloth, 2) treating contaminated water with Abate, 3) providing clean water from borehole or hand-dug wells, and 4) directing persons to avoid entering water sources when Guinea worms are emerging from their bodies, to prevent contamination of sources of drinking water (5).