growth

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growth

 [grōth]
1. the progressive development of a living thing, especially the process by which the body reaches its point of complete physical development.
2. an abnormal formation of tissue, such as a tumor.
Human Growth. Human growth from infancy to maturity involves great changes in body size and appearance, including the development of the sexual characteristics. The growth process is not a steady one: at some times growth occurs rapidly, at others slowly. Individual patterns of growth vary widely because of differences in heredity and environment. Children tend to have physiques similar to those of their parents or of earlier forebears; however, environment may modify this tendency. Living conditions, including nutrition and hygiene, have considerable influence on growth.
Glands and Growth. The regulators of growth are the endocrine glands, which are themselves subject to hereditary influence. The pituitary gland secretes growth hormone, which controls general body growth, particularly the growth of the skeleton, and also influences metabolism.

In addition to influencing growth directly, the pituitary gland has a central role in regulating the other endocrine glands. These other glands in turn control many body functions, and they secrete the various hormones that directly regulate metabolism.
Variations in Growth Rates. The growth of different individuals varies a great deal. It should be remembered that the rate of growth we call “normal” is really only an average rate. There is a wide range of growth rates, almost all of them quite normal. Of the children of a given sex and age, only about two thirds will have physical measurements that fall close to the average.

Growth in height occurs as a result of maturation of the skeleton. When the long bones have reached maturity at about age 18, linear growth stops. In general, the birth weight of the average baby doubles in 5 to 6 months and triples by the end of the first year. At the end of the second year of life birth weight quadruples and then there is a steady increase of 2 to 2.75 kg (4.4 to 6 lb.) each year until the child reaches puberty, at which time there is a period of rapid growth in weight and height.
delayed growth and development a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as deviation from age group norms.
risk for disproportionate growth a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for growth above the 97th percentile or below the 3rd percentile for age, crossing two percentile channels.

growth

(grōth),
The increase in size of a living being or any of its parts occurring in the process of development.

growth

(grōth)
1. a normal process of increase in size of an organism as a result of accretion of tissue similar to that originally present.
2. an abnormal formation, such as a tumor.
3. the proliferation of cells, as in a bacterial culture.

appositional growth  growth by addition at the periphery of a particular part.
interstitial growth  that occurring in the interior of structures already formed.

growth

(grōth)
n.
1.
a. The process of growing.
b. Full development; maturity.
2. Development from a lower or simpler to a higher or more complex form; evolution.
3. An increase, as in size, number, value, or strength; extension or expansion: population growth.
4. An abnormal mass of tissue, such as a tumor, growing in or on a living organism.

growth1

Etymology: AS, growan, to grow
1 an increase in the size of an organism or any of its parts, as measured in increments of weight, volume, or linear dimensions, that occurs as a result of hyperplasia or hypertrophy.
2 the normal progressive anatomical, physiological development from infancy to adulthood that is the result of gradual and normal processes of accretion and assimilation. The total of the numerous changes that occur during the lifetime of an individual constitutes a dynamic and complex process that involves many interrelated components, notably heredity, environment, nutrition, hygiene, and disease, all of which are subject to a variety of influences. In childhood growth is categorized according to the approximate age at which distinctive physical changes usually appear and at which specific developmental tasks are achieved. Such stages include the prenatal period, infancy, early childhood (including the toddler and the preschool periods), middle childhood, and adolescence. There are two periods of accelerated growth: (1) the first 12 months, in which the infant triples in weight, increases the height at birth by approximately 50%, and undergoes rapid motor, cognitive, and social development; and (2) the second, and the months around puberty, when the child approaches adult height and secondary sexual characteristics emerge. Physical growth may be abnormally accelerated or slowed by a defect in the hypophyseal or pituitary gland.
3 any abnormal localized increase of the size or number of cells, as in a tumor or neoplasm.
4 a proliferation of cells, specifically a bacterial culture or mold. Compare development, differentiation, maturation.

growth2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as normal increase in bone size and body weight during growth years. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

growth

(grōth)
The increase in size of a living being or any of its parts occurring in the process of development; as measured in increments of weight, volume, or linear dimensions.
Compare: bioregulator

growth

the process of increase in size which has three distinct components,
  1. cell division,
  2. assimilation,
  3. cell expansion. The basis of growth is CELL DIVISION but in order to increase in size, cells must be able to synthesize new structures that are manufactured from raw materials derived from their immediate environment. This is assimilation and it results in increase in cell size. Growth during development can be continuous but allometric (see ALLOMETRIC GROWTH), as in humans, or can be discontinuous, as in insects where growth occurs at each ECDYSIS.

growth

(grōth)
Increase in size of a living being or any of its parts occurring in process of development.

growth,

n an increase in size.
growth and development,
n the process of
growth is defined as an increase in size;
development is defined as a progression toward maturity. Thus the terms are used together to describe the complex physical, mental, and emotional processes associated with the “growing up” of children.
growth factor,
n the chemical messengers that induce cell growth by tissue type (e.g., osteoinductive factor, epidermal growth factors).
growth failure,
n a lack of normal physical and psychologic development as a result of genetic, nutritional, pathologic, or psychosocial factors. See also failure to thrive.
growth, grain,
n a phenomenon resulting from heat treatment of alloys. In excessive amounts, this growth produces undesirable physical properties.
growth hormone (GH),
n a single-chain peptide secreted by the anterior pituitary gland in response to growth hormone releasing factor (GHRF) from the hypothalamus. Growth hormone promotes protein synthesis in all cells, increased fat mobilization and use of fatty acids for energy, and decreased use of carbohydrates.

growth

1. the progressive increase in size of a living thing, especially the process by which the body reaches its point of complete physical development.
2. an abnormal formation of tissue, such as a tumor.

growth arrest line
a radiologically detectable line parallel to the growth plate in the metaphysis that indicates a temporary cessation of bone growth.
growth check
an event or state, usually the result of inadequate nutrition, parasitism or other disease, which temporarily reduces or stops growth in a young animal. Often followed by a period of compensatory growth.
compensatory growth
increased growth rate during a time period as a result of lower than normal growth rate during a previous period.
growth cone
bulbous enlargement at the tip of every growing axonal fiber in the fetus, from which many long filapodia extend.
growth curve
the curve obtained by plotting increase in size or numbers against the elapsed time.
growth disorders
are sometimes traceable to excess or shortage of pituitary secretions, and may arise from hereditary defects or from glandular abnormalities. Abnormally large secretions of growth hormone can produce gigantism. Failure of the pituitary gland to develop sufficiently or to secrete adequate amounts of growth hormone may result in dwarfism. In adulthood, overproduction of growth hormone may lead to acromegaly.
growth factor
substances which act as local regulators of cell division and function; classified as autocrine (act on cells of the same class) or paracrine (act on cells of a different class).
hematopoietic growth factors
see colony-stimulating factors.
one-step growth curve
a plot typical of the rapid growth of a virus in cell culture when all cells are infected simultaneously.
growth plate
the epiphyseal cartilage at which new bone formation occurs to lengthen long bones during their growth phase. Called also physis. See also epiphyseal plate.
growth promotants
includes all agents used to increase the rate of body weight gain. Used principally in food animals but also in horses with a view to increasing muscle mass and physical performance, and in any species to hasten recuperation in animals debilitated by illness. Pharmaceutical preparations are principally anabolic steroids. Husbandry procedures include estrogen and zearalenone implants and dietary supplementation with antibiotics, monensin and, in the case of pigs, copper.
growth rate
rate of increase in body weight per unit of time, e.g. lb/day in beef cattle.
recombinant growth factor
recombinant growth hormone.
growth retardation
stature smaller than normal; called also runt.
growth retardation lattice
radiodense metaphyseal lines parallel to the epiphyseal plate developing in fetal bone.
transforming growth factor [beta]
a family of extracellular signaling molecules important in the transformation of cells and in growth and development.

Patient discussion about growth

Q. does the growth hormone have side effects and what are they?

A. Yes, it does, and not a few. They include, among others, pain in the joints, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetes, pain at the injection site, problems with the thyroid gland, ear problems and many others. You may read more about side effects of growth hormone treatment (called Mecasermin or Somatropin) here: http://www.drugs.com/ppa/mecasermin.html

Q. Is nutrition vital for healthy hair growth? I am engaged to a girl 3 months back and our marriage is on coming month. I was above heavens when my girl told me that I am handsome. Now I am afraid whether she will hate me soon bcoz, for the past few days I have had drastic hair fall. I feel to be taking less nutrition diet. Is nutrition vital for healthy hair growth? I have dreamt my life with that beautiful angel and never want to lose on that. She can definitely add face value to my happy life. Please guide me to marry my beautiful girl.

A. HELLO ZAK...STAY CALM...IF YOUR GIRL REALLY LOVES YOU...SHE WILL NOT BE WORRIED ABOUT A LITTLE HAIR LOSS...OR A LITTLE WEIGHT GAIN.....GOOD LUCK...MRFOOT56

Q. I have a heavy growth of thin hair on my face and neck area. What can I do? I have a heavy growth of thin hair on my face and neck area. I did wax couple of times but found a thick growth of chin hair which was difficult to get rid. I did try to pluck but found that it grows back immediately within a day. I do not like to use electro hair removing. What can I do?

A. i saw couple of women that bleach their facial hair...maybe that would work?

More discussions about growth