group selection


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group selection

a process whereby selection supposedly operates on a unit consisting of two or more individuals of a group so that characters which are beneficial to the group (as opposed to an individual) are selected. The concept is somewhat dubious and generally unaccepted.
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New arguments surrounding group selection and sociobiology are summarized.
Therefore, one has to ascertain whether, and how, a sector-specific-based approach will affect the peer group selection process.
In so doing, he places the current disputes on evolutionary theory, particularly those between proponents of individual versus group selection, into a proper social, historical, and intellectual context.
The researchers note that randomization occurred at the facility level rather than at the individual level, and that it was impossible to blind study participants to their group selection, which increased the possibility of bias.
The boundary that separates the two fields of study is the principle of group selection.
Models of cultural group selection rely on patterns of cultural transmission that maintain differences between cultural groups, because either decisions are based on what most others in the group do, or non-conformists are punished in some way.
By contrast, the economist Gary Becker once argued that evolutionary "models of group selection [including the variant called 'kin selection'] are unnecessary since altruistic behavior can be selected as a consequence of individual rationality" (The Economic Approach to Human Behavior [Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976], p.
Proponents of group selection felt rightly that these three sources could not adequately account for human prosociality, but they usually acceded to a misleading formula: selection favors selfishness within groups and favors altruism only in conflict between groups.
He lays a foundation for the discussion by operationalizing altruism, presenting the oselfish geneo hypothesis as well as group selection theory, and discussing the concept of equivalence in causal explanations.
If group selection is correct, it follows that humans and other group-living creatures are fundamentally not selfish but cooperative and even altruistic--that we human beings owe our existence to distant ancestors who were members of groups that succeeded because they were better able to cooperate than other groups.
Nonindustrial landowners may alternatively choose group selection, where openings are smaller.

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