group B streptococcus

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group B streptococcus

Streptococcus agalactiae A streptococcus classified into 7 capsular serotypes, which is the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in neonates; GBS affects 1.8/1000 infants aged ≤ 90 days, and causes morbidity in ≥ 50,000 pregnant ♀/yr–US; it is a major pathogen of nonpregnant adults, affecting 2.4-4.4/105
References in periodicals archive ?
Neonatal group B streptococcal infection in South Bedfordshire 1993-1998.
on Fetus and Newborn, Guidelines for Prevention of Group B Streptococcal Infection by Chemoprophylaxis, 90 PEDIATRICS 775, 777 (1992).
This is the first time pregnant women have been immunized with a vaccine to prevent group B streptococcal infection," comments Richard A.
The following three, dealing with prevention of neonatal group B streptococcal infection, surveillance for tuberculosis (TB), and surveillance for postoperative infection, illustrate ways in which managed care can contribute to the prevention or control of serious infections.
SAN FRANCISCO -- The newly approved antibiotic linezolid may find a niche in the prophylactic treatment of group B streptococcal infection in pregnant women, Dr.
ABCs showed that hospital obstetric programs' adoption of policies to prevent group B streptococcal infection increased significantly (38) and that hospitals that had adopted or revised a policy in 1996 had significantly fewer cases in 1997 (39).
About 340 babies a year will develop a Group B streptococcal infection within seven days of birth - which is called early-onset GBS.
Isolates from all the cases of perinatal group B streptococcal infection that developed during that time have been tested for resistance to numerous antibiotics.
College of Midwives' staff member Norma Campbell has also discussed with me the draft technical report on Group B streptococcal infection and the draft consensus statement on the prevention of early onset neonatal Group B streptococcal infection.
8 times greater risk for group B streptococcal infection than those aged less than 65 years.
org/ and the article The Influence of Intrapartum Antibiotics on the Clinical Spectrum of Early-Onset Group B Streptococcal Infection in Term Infants is at http://www.
The pathogens responsible for those infections, however, changed significantly From the earlier cohort to the later cohort, the rate of group B streptococcal infections declined from 5.