ground glass

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Related to Ground-glass: ground glass appearance

ground glass

(grownd glas)
Descriptive of an opacity in radiologic imaging that may indicate various disease states.

ground glass

Abnormal shadowing seen radiographically. In chest x-ray films, it may indicate interstitial fibrosis of the lung; in abdominal films, it suggests ascites.
See also: glass

glass

1. a hard, brittle, often transparent material, usually consisting of the fused amorphous silicates of potassium or sodium, and of calcium, with silica in excess.
2. a container, usually cylindrical, made from glass.

glass embolism
small particles of glass from a vial may be injected suspended in a fluid.
ground glass
may be used in an attempt to poison animals maliciously but has little effect. May cause transient enteritis.
glass housing
glass cover of the x-ray tube; contains the anode and cathode and the vacuum that makes generation and control of the x-ray beam possible.
soluble glass
glass in which the magnesium and calcium content have been modified from that in normal glass so that it is much more soluble in water or ruminal contents. Used in the form of a reticular retention bolus as a vehicle for therapeutic agents such as antibiotics or anthelmintics which are delivered to the animal over a period of weeks or months.
References in periodicals archive ?
High Discrepancy of driver mutations in patients with NSCLC and synchronous multiple lung ground-glass nodules.
Radiographs revealed that the FD in our patient had a ground-glass appearance.
Our patient developed centrilobular ground-glass nodules before initiation of everolimus therapy, and these nodules progressed to a "crazy paving" pattern after everolimus was started.
The ground-glass infiltrates should not be ignored ormis-interpreted as tumor progression7.
Ground-glass appearance, increased nodular or streaky pathcy intensities may be observed in acute BFD.
extensive ground-glass opacities, nodules, consolidation and discrete cysts) or an NSIP pattern on imaging, as radiological and pathological correlation is inconsistent in these situations.
HRCT of the chest (figure 2) showed the presence of widespread nodular intra-alveolar opacities of calcific density with diffuse ground-glass attenuation, more pronounced in the lower pulmonary regions.
Ground-glass opacity (GGO) is defined as a hazy increase in lung density with preservation of airway and vessel margins.
Basing the frequency of low-dose CT in high-risk patients on the size and status (solid, nonsolid, part-solid, ground-glass, ground-glass opacity) of the nodule on baseline CT.
The CXR revealed bilateral reticular-nodular and ground-glass opacities without any effusions (Fig.
Radiography (standard X-ray) showed peripheral lung opacities, and computed tomography (CT) revealed peripheral ground-glass opacities.
The single nodular form appears as a peripheral nodule or localized ground-glass attenuation with or without consolidation, while the diffuse nodular form appears as multiple nodules or areas of ground-glass attenuation or consolidation [9].