gross

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Related to Gross energy: digestible protein, digestible energy

gross

 [grōs]
coarse or large; visible to the naked eye.

Gross

(grōs),
Ludwik, 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Gross virus, Gross leukemia virus.

gross

(grōs),
Coarse or large; large enough to be visible to the naked eye; macroscopic.
[L. grossus, thick]

gross

(grōs)
1. coarse or large.
2. visible to the naked eye without the use of magnification.

gross

Etymology: OFr, gros, large
1 macroscopic, as in gross pathology; the study of tissue changes without magnification by a microscope.
2 large or obese. Compare microscopic.

gross

(grōs)
Coarse or large; large enough to be visible to the naked eye.
[L. grossus, thick]

gross

coarse or large; visible to the naked eye.

gross energy
total energy of a feed as measured by direct calorimetry.
gross income
total income before costs have been deducted.
gross margin
total returns from an enterprise minus the variable costs incurred by the enterprise.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition Gross Energy (GE) (370 - 374Kcal/100g) were very comparable to the GE of maize and higher than GE of cassava, Irish potato, yam, sweet potato and taro and are less than the GE of rice and sorghum [16].
Mean ([+ or -] SD) gross energy and percent total nitrogen in tallow pulp were 34.
The gross energy contents of diet, shrimp, feces, and molt were measured with a 1281 Oxygen Bomb Calorimeter (Parr Instrument Company, Illinois, USA).
the natural gas needed to produce oilsands) and thus encourages valuations of energy production scenarios in terms of their net energy gains rather than simply their gross energy outputs.
One key to understanding and therefore predicting your own personal weight loss is understanding the difference between net and gross energy cost.
The amount of energy absorbed by the body is always less than the gross energy of foods eaten because some components, such as fiber, cannot be fully digested.
In brief, gross energy requirements were calculated for individuals of each age, sex, reproductive status (immature, mature, pregnant), and day of the year by using information on Steller sea lion energetics (basal metabolic rates, active metabolic rates, activity budgets, body growth and composition, digestive efficiency and the heat increment of feeding or the efficiency of using metabolizable energy).
Gross energy in feed and feces was measured by bomb calorimetry.
In the energy sector, the OECD urged member countries to ''progressively reduce the carbon content in energy used,'' and ''significantly increase the share of renewable energy in gross energy supply.
In the last fiscal year, gross energy generation was 3,270 GWh (gigawatt hours), a decline of 14.