great ape

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Related to Great Apes: Pongidae, Primates, hominid

great ape

n.
Any of various apes of the family Hominidae, which includes the chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and humans, but not the gibbons.

great ape

one of the larger monkeys, usually the tailless ones; includes gorilla, orang-utan, chimpanzee.
References in periodicals archive ?
The near-complete pierolapithecus skeleton found near Barcelona shows a variety of important features shared by modern great apes.
Furthermore, moral and legal issues raised by the Great Ape Project have implications beyond the treatment of great apes.
Great apes cannot, of course, vote, because they cannot act responsibly; they do not know right from wrong.
Project brings together 34 scientists and scholars from nine countries, including Jane Goodall, Roger and Deborah Fouts, Francine Patterson, and others with years of hands-on experience with great apes.
We also are confident that this first-ever international project will prevent the extinction of our great apes through Great Ape Trust's world-renowned scientists.
Another possibility, the researchers say, is that there are age-related changes in the brains of humans and great apes that interact with well-being.
adds, "Science and ethics compel that standards governing humans -- the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, the Declaration of Helsinki, and the Geneva Convention -- should logically extend to great apes.
Orangutans are the only great apes to dwell primarily in trees.
The Great Ape Project supports granting basic legal protections to great apes.
Expert Dr Frans de Waal said: "Although elephants are far more distantly related to us than the great apes, they seem to have evolved similar social and cognitive capacities.
But the current population is still genetically diverse enough for the great apes to be pulled back from the brink.
Coverage includes an overview of the role of play followed by discussion of the various types of play--social, object, and fantasy--in great apes and humans.