gravitropism


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gravitropism

(grə-vĭt′rə-pĭz′əm)
n.
Growth or movement of a sessile organism in response to gravity, as the downward growth of plant roots. Also called geotropism.

grav′i·tro′pic (grăv′ĭ-trō′pĭk) adj.

gravitropism

(formerly
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References in periodicals archive ?
The most favored hypothesis is "starch-statolith hypothesis" but the precise molecular mechanism of gravitropism is still unknown.
Additional QTLs for P accumulation may be explained by basal root gravitropism, resulting in a shallower root system that may enhance root exploration of the surface soil horizons where P is concentrated (Bonser et al.
As already mentioned, however, there are a number of reasons other than the study of gravitropism at the cell level to warrant the study of higher plant cells in the space environment.
Five of these mutants displays hypocotyl gravitropism and only one has a significantly increased root length.
Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the only active auxin found in plants today and is involved in numerous physiological processes in plants, including cellular elongation, phototropism, gravitropism, apical dominance, root initiation, ethylene production, fruit growth, sex expression, and weed control.
Gravitropism is the movement of a plant organ in response to gravity.
Root gravitropism is the tendency of a root to grow at a specific orientation with respect to gravity, or Gravitropic Setpoint Angle ("GSA," Firn and Digby, 1997).
However, the rhizoid (a rootlike extension) of the alga Chara is a model system in which all stages of gravitropism can be analyzed in a single cell (Braun and Sievers, 1994; Kiss, 1994; Sievers et al.
However, disordered root growth and negative gravitropism should occur with the necrosis of the root cap and, consequently, in statoliths (BURGOS et al.
For example, the section on regulation of root growth has chapters on each of the five major growth substances, followed by chapters on root signals, environmental sensing, and even two chapters on gravitropism that look at the phenomenon from very different perspectives.
It should be emphasized that gravitropism occurs, although at low efficiency, in the absence of microtubules and microfilaments.
Hydrotropism and its interaction with gravitropism in maize roots.