grain

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Related to Grain growth: Recrystallization, hot working

grain

 [grān]
1. a seed, especially of a cereal plant.
2. the smallest unit in the apothecaries' and avoirdupois systems, equal to 0.065 of a gram; abbreviated gr.

grain

(grān),
1. One of the cereal plants, or its seed.
2. A hard, minute particle of any substance, for example, sand.
3. A unit of weight equivalent to 0.064799 grain [For other equivalents, see appendix, Weights and Measures].
4. A macroscopically visible cluster of organisms living in tissue of patients with actinomycosis or mycetoma.
5. A particle of a silver halide in a photographic emulsion.
[L. granum]

grain (gr)

Etymology: L, granum, seed
the smallest unit of mass in avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries' weights formerly based on the weight of a plump grain of wheat. The grain is the same and is equal to 65 mg. The troy and apothecaries' ounces contain 480 grains; the avoirdupois ounce contains 437.5 grains.

grain

(1) An obsolete, non-SI (International System) unit of weight formerly used by pharmacists, equal to 0.0648 g. 
(2) A nonspecific term for any granule particle (e.g., a psammoma body), seen by light microscopy; the term is no longer used in pathology.
(3) A cereal plant—e.g., barley, oat, wheat—or seed thereof.

grain

(gr) (grān)
1. Cereal plants (e.g., corn, wheat, or rye), or a seed of one of them.
2. A minute, hard particle of any substance, as of sand.
3. A unit of weight, 1/60 dram (apoth. or troy), 1/437.5 avoirdupois ounce, 1/480 troy ounce, 1/5760 troy pound, 1/7000 avoirdupois pound; the equivalent of 0.064799 gram.
[L. granum]

grain

(gr) (grān)
1. One of the cereal plants, or its seed.
2. A hard, minute particle of any substance, e.g., sand.
3. The grain is obsolete as a unit in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and nursing. Avoid abbreviationgr, which is subject to frequent misinterpretation. A unit of weight equivalent to 64.79 mg.
4. A particle of a silver halide in a photographic emulsion.
[L. granum]

grain (gr),

n 1. a unit of weight equal to 0.0648 g.
n 2. a crystal of an alloy.
grain boundary,
n the junction of two grains growing from different nuclei, impinging and causing discontinuity of the lattice structure. Important in corrosion and brittleness of metals.
grain growth,

grain

1. a seed, especially of a cereal plant; for best results in feeding the seed may be rolled, cracked, flaked (below).
2. the twentieth part of a scruple: 0.065 g; abbreviated gr. See also Table 4.2.
3. the texture and patterned appearance of the outside of leather.
4. the size and nature of the crystals of the fluorescent salt used in intensifying screens and also the size and nature of silver halide crystals used in photographic emulsion.

grain engorgement
flaked grain
grain that has been cooked and then rolled flat. The digestibility is greatly enhanced but the process is costly.
grain fumigants
substances used to fumigate silos full of grain to kill insect pests. Use of these agents other than as recommended by the makers may lead to poisoning. See also methyl bromide.
high-moisture grain
see moist grain storage.
grain itch mites
micronized grain
heated in a dry heat then rolled.
grain overload
popped grain
grain passed across a heated plate and popped like popcorn.
grain rash
grain itch mite dermatitis.
roasted grain
roasted in dry heat but not popped.
grain screenings
debris from a grain batch that is removed by passing it over a screen. Has some feeding value but this varies with the mix of contents.
grain sorghum
Sorghum bicolor (S. vulgare).
spent grain
grain used in brewing or liquor production that has been exhausted of its carbohydrate; includes brewer's grains, distiller's grains.
sprouted grain

Patient discussion about grain

Q. What and how much intake should I have 1. Vegetables, 2. Fruits and whole grain… I am 21 years old and would like to know that in order to get the required fiber per day what and how much intake should I have 1. Vegetables, 2. Fruits and whole grain…

A. actually men under 50 should have 38 grams a day of fiber. here is a nice article about fiber consuming and a list of foods that contain fiber and the amount of it:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/fiber/NU00033/METHOD=print

More discussions about grain
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, this temperature is still lower than the onset temperature for severe grain growth, (27) so the Al diffusion is also enhanced with the increasing temperature.
Since the fibrous texture of the condensates forms as a result of the directional growth of columnar grains, on the basis of the analysis of the distribution of pole density may be assumed that in the case of pure copper grain growth takes place in the <111> direction, and when iron atoms added to copper, the direction of grain growth may coincide with both the <111> direction and <100>and <100>.
Annealing thin nickel layers with large dislocation density and small grain size, at temperatures up to 375 K does not lead to large scale grain growth and changes in dislocation density.
The ideal hardening temperature is that which takes into solution the maximum amount of carbide with the minimum amount of grain growth.
Techniques for modelling microstructure and optimising processes are explored, along with recrystallisation, grain growth, and severe plastic deformation.
In Reeled Condit Ion Max Allowable Peripherial Grain Growth On Extruded Secti On 5% Of The Nominal Diamension All Over(Ref.
Therefore, it is expected that reduction of both components of grain growth had significant effect on grain yield reduction in this condition.
Recrystallization and grain growth are fundamental to microstructure evolution during the annealing and thermomechanical processing of engineering materials, so of great importance in a wide range of fields.
The grain growth was observed as a consequence of heat treatment at higher temperature (450[degrees]C) of thin film 7 as shown in Fig.
Among these are the motion of grain boundary systems with triple and quadruple junctions; the effect of grain boundary faceting on grain boundary motion; grain growth in systems of two and three dimensions; and the influence of grain boundary junctions on grain growth kinetics, on the evolution of grain microstructure, and on the stability of fine grained and nanocrystalline materials.