gradient

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gradient

 [gra´de-ent]
rate of increase or decrease of a variable value, or its representative curve.
edge gradient in radiology, the penumbra or partial shadow on a radiograph caused by the three-dimensional shape of an object.
electrochemical gradient the difference in ion concentration and electrical potential from one point to another, so that ions tend to move passively along it.

gra·di·ent

(grā'dē-ĕnt),
Rate of change of temperature, pressure, magnetic field, or other variable as a function of distance, time, or other continuously changing influence.

gradient

/gra·di·ent/ (gra´de-ent) rate of increase or decrease of a variable value, or its graphic representation.
electrochemical gradient  a difference in ion concentration between two points so that ions tend to move passively along it.

gradient

(grā′dē-ənt)
n. Abbr. grad.
1. A rate of inclination; a slope.
2. An ascending or descending part; an incline.
3. Physics The rate at which a physical quantity, such as temperature or pressure, changes in response to changes in a given variable, especially distance.
4. Biology A series of progressively increasing or decreasing differences in the growth rate, metabolism, or physiological activity of a cell, organ, or organism.

gradient

[grā′dē·ənt]
Etymology: L, gradus, step
1 the rate of increase or decrease of a measurable phenomenon, such as temperature or pressure.
2 a visual representation of the rate of change of a measurable phenomenon; a curve.

gra·di·ent

(grā'dē-ĕnt)
Rate of change of temperature, pressure, or other variable, as a function of factors of distance or time.

gra·di·ent

(grā'dē-ĕnt)
Rate of change of temperature, pressure, magnetic field, or other variable as a function of distance, time, or other continuously changing influence.

gradient

rate of increase or decrease of a variable value.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords Emulsion polymerization, Gradient latex particle, Sequence distribution, Nuclear magnetic resonance
The interest in understanding turbulent boundary layer flows with pressure gradients also stems from the requirement to model such flows.
The basic idea was based on the topological gradient approach used for crack detection (Amstutz et al.
2] tension gradients appears to be limited to their negative predictive value to exclude a low cardiac output state when CVA-C[O.
Such a nanoparticle gradient surface provides a combinatorial platform for surface adsorption selectivity.
Nevertheless, one vital piece of information is often overlooked: the likely presence of transverse moisture gradients.
The density of the molten metal also varies with the composition, so that gradients of concentration lead to density gradients.
For styrene-methyl acrylate (S-MA) and styrene-butyl acrylate (S-BA) copolymers, the separations performed on polar columns were more efficient when solvent gradients with increasing polarity were employed, whereas the opposite occurred with nonpolar columns (8).
This gradient system will increase productivity and enhance existing capabilities including contrast enhanced neuro and peripheral MR angiography, breath-hold abdominal imaging, neuro-perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging," he added.
It doesn't get rid of the temperature gradients, but it changes their distribution," explains Beaumont.
He speculates that cells bearing RGM form one of two chemical gradients that sprouting retinal axons use to orient themselves.
in the curing of rubber there are two main requirements: for efficiency the heating and cooling cycle must be kept as short as possible, but for uniformity in the finished products the temperature gradients in the article must be minimized.