regulation

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regulation

 [reg″u-la´shun]
1. the act of adjusting or state of being adjusted to a certain standard.
2. in biology, the adaptation of form or behavior of an organism to changed conditions.
3. the power to form a whole embryo from stages before the gastrula.
4. the biochemical mechanisms that control the expression of genes.
hemodynamic regulation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as optimization of heart rate, preload, afterload and contractility. See also hemodynamic monitoring.
temperature regulation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as attaining and/or maintaining body temperature within a normal range.
temperature regulation: intraoperative in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as attaining and/or maintaining desired intraoperative body temperature.

reg·u·la·tion

(reg'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. An epigentic process whereby the developmental fates of rates of cell development of embryonic subsystems may change during embryonic development, thereby compensating for defects and permitting normal development of the embryo as a whole. The human embryo is termed regulatory because its tissues and organs are not determined but become so according to the relationship of the different parts to each other.
2. In experimental embryology, the power of a pregastrula embryo to continue approximately normal development after a part or parts have been manipulated or destroyed.
[L. regula, a rule]

regulation

/reg·u·la·tion/ (reg″u-la´shun)
1. the act of adjusting or state of being adjusted to a certain standard.
2. in biology, the adaptation of form or behavior of an organism to changed conditions.
3. the power to form a whole embryo from stages before the gastrula.reg´ulatory

regulation

(rĕg′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. The act of regulating or the state of being regulated.
2. Embryology The capacity of an embryo to continue normal development following injury to or alteration of a structure.

reg·u·la·tion

(reg'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Control of the rate or manner in which a process progresses or a product is formed.
2. experimental embryology The power of a pregastrula embryo to continue approximately normal development after a part or parts have been manipulated or destroyed.
3. A rule or order issued by a regulatory agency of government or some other recognized authority (e.g., a rule on licensure of health care professionals issued by a state, province, or any other subnational jurisdiction).
[L. regula, a rule]

regulation

  1. (in embryology) the process of determining normal development, even in cases of damage, where a properly formed embryo may result even after the loss of a large part. In many animals regulation after damage is possible only before fertilization but in others it may take place in later development.
  2. the limitation of a population over a period of time by natural factors such as DENSITY DEPENDENT FACTORS.

regulation

1. the act of adjusting or state of being adjusted to a certain standard.
2. in biology, the adaptation of form or behavior of an organism to changed conditions.
3. the power of a pregastrula stage to form a whole embryo from a part.
4. the biochemical mechanisms that control the expression of genes.
5. in law the lesser rules promulgated under the authority of an Act of Parliament, and which can be altered by consultation short of presenting a bill to the Parliament.

feedback regulation
a mechanism for regulating metabolic processes involving the active and regulatory sites of allosteric enzyme proteins.

Patient discussion about regulation

Q. My hormones are always out of wake. How can I regulate my periods? I like to try with herbs. I am 32 years old and I have 2 children. After my second delivery I had irregular periods. I have been on BC most of my life to regulate my periods but I don't like them. And I feel sick. My physician said that my thyroid is low but within normal range. My hormones are always out of wake. How can I regulate my periods? I like to try with herbs.

A. My dear your decision is good. There is nothing to feel sick; most of the women are having this problem. My daughter had the same problem like you; we tried so many meds but in vain. At last we tried with herbal meds really it is amazing, after that she had regular period. Now she is happy. I suggest you to try with herbal meds. Good Luck.

More discussions about regulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Democratic belief that there is too much government regulation reached a high of 36% in 2006, nearly matching the Republicans' 40% that year.
A number of Americans view the federal government negatively, and it's likely that for many in this group, their negative perceptions of government regulation of business at least partially reflect their doubts that government's getting more involved in such endeavors would produce positive outcomes.
Indeed, government regulation is invidious: It dampens productivity, saps innovation, damages business investment, creates uncertainty, costs a lot of money, promotes frustration, supports two insufferable groups - lawyers and bureaucrats - and drives otherwise sensible people mad.
Those results showed that about a quarter of Americans felt there was too little government regulation of business and industry.
The current law fails to limit the use of government regulation under the principle of take and pay.
He said that in their opinion such amendments and changes will be brought in the FATA Local Government Regulations which will guarantee the use of political, administrative and financial powers of the local government by the public representatives.
Evolving SLAs dictate shorter backup windows to reduce departmental downtime, while government regulations dictate fast and ongoing access to more and more data.
Welsh small businesses spend on average 21 hours a month dealing with all government regulations and paperwork, although this almost doubles for businesses with more than 11 employees which spend 26 hours a month on compliance-related paperwork.
Additional presentations will focus on government regulations, existing and proposed, and their effect on the foundry industry, as well as principles for preventing lawsuits.
In comparison, chemical companies screen 20,000 to 200,000 potential chemicals to find a single new product to meet government regulations.
It's not unusual to hear beleaguered business owners complaining about burdensome government regulations.

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