retained surgical sponge

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retained surgical sponge

A term of art referring to an intraoperative mistake discovered postoperatively, in which one or more surgical sponges, gauze pads or other form of textile is left behind in the operative field after closing the patient. Retained surgical sponges may become a nidus for infection, and are often grounds for malpractice lawsuits.
References in periodicals archive ?
2,10) As there was no prior history of laparotomy or intrauterine packing following abortion, gossypiboma was not considered.
The condition is sometimes called gossypiboma, derived from the Latin gossypium (Cotton) and the Swahili boma (Place of concealment).
Although the true incidence of the problem, formally called gossypiboma, is probably underreported, one estimate suggests it occurs as often as 1 in every 7000 procedures.
Accurate incidence of gossypiboma is hampered by the reluctance to report these cases, as well as the confidentiality agreements following legal settlements.
Madam, Gossypiboma is a rare surgical complication defined as a retained surgical tool, which is mostly a sponge, in the body after a surgical procedure.
Gossypiboma (textiloma, gauzeoma, muslinoma, cottonbaloma, cottonoid) is the term used to describe a retained "mass of cotton".
Due to recent pelvic surgery, the imaging characteristics of the mass, and the normal appearance of both ovaries, a gossypiboma was considered.
Gossypiboma of early presentation as cause of acute abdominal pain
Although extremely rare, there has been the seldom-reported condition of a Gossypiboma.
Gossypiboma (retained surgical swab) is a rare occurrence secondary to a previous open surgical procedure.
Textiloma and gossypiboma are non-medical terms used to describe a mass of cotton matrix that is left behind in a body cavity during an operation1.
Herein, we report a case of gossypiboma presented as an abdominal lump 7 years after open cholecystectomy.