Staphylococcus aureus

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Related to Golden staphylococcus: Staphylococcus aureus, Staph aureus

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

a common species found especially on nasal mucous membrane and skin (hair follicles); bacterial species that produces exotoxins including those that cause toxic shock syndrome, with resulting skin rash, and renal, hepatic, and central nervous system disease, and an enterotoxin associated with food poisoning; it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections; also a cause of infection in burn patients; humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.

Staphylococcus aureus

Etymology: Gk, staphyle + kokkos + L, aurum, gold
a species of Staphylococcus that produces a golden pigment with some color variations and is commonly found on the skin or nose of healthy people. It is also responsible for a number of pyogenic infections, such as boils, carbuncles, and abscesses. S. aureus infections have become increasingly more difficult to treat because of the development of resistance to penicillin-related antibiotics. These bacteria are called methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSAs.

Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus pyogenes Microbiology The most common pathogenic staphylococcus, which is often part of the normal human microflora, and linked to opportunistic infections Predisposing factors Nonspecific immune defects–Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, chronic granulomatous disease, hypogammaglobulinemia, folliculitis; skin injury–burns, surgery; presence of foreign bodies–eg, sutures, prosthetic devices; systemic disease–eg, CA, alcoholism, heart disease, viral infection; antibiotic therapy Clinical Folliculitis, bronchopneumonia

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs aw'rē-ŭs)
A bacterial common species found especially on nasal mucous membranes and skin (hair follicles); it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections, and food poisoning; also a cause of infection in burn patients. Humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.

Staphylococcus aureus

common Gram-positive coagulase-positive Staphylococcus species; part of normal skin flora; causes skin infections, e.g. boils, abscesses, paronychia, pyaemia, osteomyelitis and wound infections

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs aw'rē-ŭs)
Common species found especially on nasal mucous membranes and skin (hair follicles); bacterial species that produces exotoxins including those that cause toxic shock syndrome, with resulting skin rash, and renal, hepatic, and central nervous system disease, and an enterotoxin associated with food poisoning; it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections; also a cause of infection in burn patients; humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.

Staphylococcus

a genus of spherical, gram-positive bacteria tending to occur in grapelike clusters; they are normal flora on the skin and in the upper respiratory tract and are the most common cause of localized suppurating infections. Pathogenic species are characterized by positive reactions to the coagulase test.

Staphylococcus aureus
a common and important cause of disease in animals including bovine mastitis, tick pyemia (enzootic staphylococcosis), abscesses, dermatitis, furunculosis, meningitis, osteomyelitis, food poisoning, wound suppuration, and bumblefoot in poultry. S. aureus subsp. anaerobius causes lesions similar to caseous lymphadenitis in sheep.
Staphylococcus epidermidis
a common skin and mucosal inhabitant in humans and occasionally in animals living in association with humans.
Staphylococcus hyicus (Staphylococcus hyos)
causes exudative epidermitis and occasionally septic arthritis in pigs.
Staphylococcus intermedius
the major isolate from pyoderma and occasionally other pyogenic infections in dogs and cats and a rare cause of infection in other species.
Staphylococcus xylosus
a rare cause of mastitis in cattle.

Patient discussion about Staphylococcus aureus

Q. What is MRSA? I’ve heard on the news that some hospitals have a higher rate of MRSA infection. What is MRSA?

A.
MRSA - Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is a nick name for a specific subtype of bacteria from the Staph bacteria family, which is found resistant to many of the common antibiotics that are in use today. This is due to a mutation development in the Staph bacteria, which allowed it to grow resistance against the killing ingredient in common antibiotics, therefore making it a harder infection to treat and cure. Hospitals keep track of their MRSA infections for epidemiological reasons, in order to get a perspective on bacterial resistance to antibiotics, hoping new and more effective antibiotic medication will be researched.

Q. My father was hospitalized for pneumonia. The doctors said they are afraid of HA-MRSA. Why is it so scary? My father was hospitalized for pneumonia last week. The doctors wanted to discharge him as quick as possible because they said that they are afraid of Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA). Why is it so scary?

A. Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of sepsis and death due to the fact that are very limited antibiotics that kill it.
Because of this it is the nightmare of doctors.
This bacteria is very durable and is very common in hospitals, and because of it, its always better to be at the hospital the minimum time needed.

Q. can staphylococcus in woman cause infertility? staphylococcus/infertility

A. Not that I know about. One of the major routes in which bacteria cause infertility in women is through inflammation of the pelvis (PID), but staphylococcus isn't a major cause of this disease.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000888.htm

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