Gofman

Gof·man

(gof'măn),
Moses, 20th-century German physician. See: Gofman test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gofman, PhD, MD, Samuel Epstein, MD, Rosalie Bertell, PhD, Janette D.
Feyga Gofman, COO and chief chemist, stated, "Over the past month the sales of all our disinfectant products has increased at our Cleaning Ideas stores and at our wholesale division.
Gofman believed that patients have a right to know the radiation dose they receive from each diagnostic and interventional radiological procedure they undergo, and that these doses should be measured, not calculated, and should be entered in patient medical records.
What we do know with certainty is that irradiation causes a host of unnatural and sometimes unidentifiable chemicals to be formed within the irradiated foods," Gofman says.
The number of cancer doses is so high as to make calculations extraneous," says Gofman.
Gofman has ignored some valid reasons why residents need restricted parking.
Gofman, JW, Radiation and Human Haelth: A Comprehensive investigation of the Evidence Relating Low-Level Radiation to Cancer and Other Disease.
Gofman, particles of uranium smaller than 5 microns in diameter can be permanently trapped in the lungs.
In 1970, Gofman and his colleague Arthur Tamplin wrote to The Lancet (2) expressing their concern that the amount of radiation needed to double the risk of breast cancer was very low.
Burdick (current term expires 2012) Irina Gofman (current term expires 2011) Kaj Gradevik (current term expires 2010) Lev Khasis (current term expires 2010) Werner Klatten (current term expires 2010) Alexander Rodnyansky (current term expires 2012) Oleg Sysuev (current term expires 2011) Notes to Editors:
GOFMAN, RADIATION AND HUMAN HEALTH 54-55, 59 (1981), PX-1046)), rev'd on other grounds, 816 F.
John Gofman, professor of medical physics at the University of California in Berkeley, and author of the book, Radiation-Induced Cancer from Low-Level Exposure, began studying the risks of radon exposure in the 1950.