goblet cell

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Related to Goblet cells: Paneth Cells, Crypts of Lieberkuhn

gob·let cell

an epithelial cell that becomes distended with a large accumulation of mucinogen-containing secretory granules at its apical end, giving it the appearance of a goblet.

goblet cell

n.
Any of the specialized epithelial cells found in the mucous membrane of the stomach, intestines, and respiratory passages that secrete mucus.

goblet cell

Etymology: ME, gobelet, small bowl
one of the many specialized epithelial cells that secrete mucus and form glands of the epithelium of the stomach, the intestine, and parts of the respiratory tract. Also called beaker cell, chalice cell. See also gland.
A caliceal mucin-secreting, located in the lateral wall of the intestinal crypts, and in columnar epithelium of the GI tract

gob·let cell

(gob'lĕt sel)
An epithelial cell that becomes distended with a large accumulation of mucous secretory granules at its apical end, giving it the appearance of a goblet.
Synonym(s): beaker cell.

goblet cell

or

chalice cell

a cell shaped something like a wineglass that is present in the columnar epithelium of the mammalian intestine and secretes MUCIN.

goblet cell

solitary mucus-secreting cell, especially of the intestinal and respiratory epithelium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Goblet cell carcinoids and related tumors of the vermiform appendix.
The most common types were pseudostratified cylindrical ciliated epithelium with goblet cells (figures 2 and 3), stratified cuboidal epithelium (figures 4 and 5), and stratified squamous nonkeratinized epithelium (figures 6 and 7).
First, immunohistochemical studies have found that non-goblet cell columnar epithelium is essentially intesfinalized, even though goblet cells are not identified.
According to the WHO classification, endocrine tumors of the appendix are defined as (1) a well-differentiated endocrine tumor with benign behavior (confined to the appendiceal wall, with a diameter [less than or equal to] 2 cm and without angioinvasion) or uncertain behavior (confined to the subserosa or with a maximal diameter >2 cm or angioinvasion); (2) a well-differentiated endocrine carcinoma (invading the mesoappendix or beyond and/ or with metastases); or (3) goblet cell carcinoma (Table).
A dual differentiation of tumor cell type is seen within the nests: neuroendocrine cells with eosinophilic, granular cytoplasm, and mucinous goblet cells of gastrointestinal type.
If mBAC can be considered the prototype of a tumor with differentiated bronchiolar goblet cell features, the assignment of the adenocarcinomas exhibiting intestinal markers appears less obvious, as previously discussed.
The presence of intestinal-type goblet cells (ITGCs) in sections of endoscopic esophageal biopsies is considered essential for the diagnosis of Barrett metaplasia (BM).
The tumor was composed of adenomatous groups of goblet cells containing predominantly vacuolated cytoplasm with basal round to crescentic nuclei containing a single small nucleolus.
The surface layer is composed of ciliated epithelial cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells.
Cells from the tops of colon crypts showed profiles compatible with mature enterocytes, whereas cell groups from the bottoms of crypts showed profiles compatible with immature cells, goblet cells, and stem cells/progenitor cells.