glycylcycline

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glycylcycline

(gli-sil-sī-klēn),
One of a class of antibiotics chemically related to the tetracyclines.
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All isolates tested were susceptible to all non-[beta]-lactam antibacterial agents, comprising glycopeptides, lipopeptides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, rifampins, streptogramins, glycylcyclines, folate pathway inhibitors, aminoglycosides, and fosfomycin.
Tigecycline, the first of a new class of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the glycylcyclines, was recently licensed in South Africa for the parenteral treatment of adult patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) and complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs).
Tigecycline, the first of a novel class of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the glycylcyclines, was recently licensed in South Africa for the parenteral treatment of adult patients with complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) and complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs).
In this scenario, the development of a new class of antimicrobial agents, glycylcyclines, represented by tigecycline, a 9-t-butylglyclamide derivative of minocycline is a significant advancement (2-5).
This insight was further expanded by the medicinal chemistry team as part of the strategy which led to the discovery of Tygacil(R) (tigecycline), the first in a new class of intravenous antibiotics, glycylcyclines.
The glycylcyclines were developed to help overcome these resistance mechanisms.
2005 has seen the launch of the first in a new class of antibiotics, the glycylcyclines from Wyeth.
The few therapeutic options for treating infections caused by organisms containing these [beta]-lactamases are aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, polymyxins, or combinations (1).
Tigecycline, the first agent of the new broad-spectrum class of glycylcyclines, has been shown to have excellent activity against Gram-negative pathogens including ESBL-producing isolates, Acinetobacter spp.
TYGACIL, the first antibiotic approved in a new class called glycylcyclines, was developed by Wyeth to overcome key mechanisms of resistance that have affected antibiotic use.