glycoside

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Related to Glycosides: anthraquinone glycosides, Digitalis glycosides

glycoside

 [gli´ko-sīd]
any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, such as fructoside (fructose), glucoside (glucose), or pentoside (pentose).
cardiac glycoside any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (Digitalis, etc.), having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd),
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar, leaving the anomeric carbon as the link; thus, condensation through the carbon with an alcohol, which loses its hydrogen on its hydroxyl group, yields an alcohol-glycoside (or a glycosido-alcohol); links with a purine or pyrimidine -NH- group yield glycosyl (or N-glycosyl) compounds.

glycoside

/gly·co·side/ (gli´ko-sīd) any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc.
cardiac glycoside  any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (e.g., Digitalis, Strophanthus, Urginea ), acting on the contractile force of cardiac muscle; some are used as cardiotonics and antiarrhythmics.
digitalis glycoside  any of a number of cardiotonic and antiarrhythmic glycosides derived from Digitalis purpurea and D. lanata, or any drug chemically and pharmacologically related to these glycosides.

glycoside

(glī′kə-sīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, occurring abundantly in plants, that yield a sugar and one or more nonsugar substances on hydrolysis.

gly′co·sid′ic (-sĭd′ĭk) adj.

glycoside

[glī′kəsīd]
Etymology: Gk, glykys, sweet
any of several carbohydrates that yield a sugar and a nonsugar on hydrolysis. The plant Digitalis purpurea yields a glycoside used in the treatment of heart disease.

glycoside

Biochemistry
A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal nitrogen glycoside or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin and ouabain.

Herbal medicine
Any of a number of medicinally active compounds produced by plants, which include hydrocyanic (prussic acid), which gives cough syrup its bitter almond flavour, digitoxin, a cardioactive agent, and salicin, the basis for salicylic acid.

glycoside

Pharmacology A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal, nitrogen glycoside, or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin, ouabain

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the H of the hemiacetal or hemiketal OH of the sugar, leaving the O of this OH as the link.

glycoside

an acetal derivative of a sugar that, on hydrolysis by enzymes or acids, gives rise to a sugar. Glycosides containing glucose are called glucosides, those with galactose are called galactosides. They render unwanted substances chemically inert or form food reserves such as GLYCOGEN.

Glycoside

An herbal carbohydrate that exerts powerful effect on hormone-producing tissues. The glycoside breaks down into a sugar and a non-sugar component.
Mentioned in: Echinacea

glycoside,

n plant-derived compound that breaks down into a sugar and an aglycon when processed with water.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar.

glycoside (gli´kōsīd),

n a compound that contains a sugar as part of the molecule.

glycoside

any compound containing a carbohydrate moiety (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically after the sugar contained, as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc.

cardiac glycoside
any one of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (e.g. Digitalis) having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle. See also cardenolide, bufadienolide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypersil ODS column (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA) for triterpene glycosides and a 250 mm x 4.
Five iridoid glycosides including one new compound, 7-O-butylmorroniside (1), together with four known compounds, loganin (2), morroniside (3), 7R-0-methylmorroniside (4), 7S-0-methylmorroniside (5) were isolated from the n-BuOH fraction of C.
WAYZATA, Minnesota, April 14, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) today published a Scientific Opinion, which confirms that steviol glycosides, sweeteners extracted from the stevia plant, are safe for use in foods and beverages and establishes an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for their safe consumption.
The only commercially available steviol glycosides available today are derived from stevia plants grown and harvested in an agriculture setting.
What makes steviol glycosides an exception to the rule?
In seven updated and clearly organized chapters, scientists from Germany, the UK, and Australia overview the biochemistry, physiology, and function of secondary metabolism and review the major groups of secondary metabolites: alkaloids and betalains, cyanogenic glucosides, glucosinolates and nonprotein amino acids, phenyl propanoids and related phenolics, terpenoids, cardiac glycosides, and saponins.
Ginkgo biloba is one of the three main ingredients in TRF; it has three components whose mechanisms of action reduce tinnitus: (1) flavonol glycosides, responsible for ginkgo's antioxidant actions; (2) ginkgolide fractions of terpene lactones, which support blood vessel relaxation and inhibit platelet activating factor, resulting in increased circulation, especially in the micro-capillaries that feed the brain, eyes, and ears; and (3) the bilobalide fraction of terpene lactones, which protects brain neurons by affecting gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors in the brain and by glutamate antagonism and antioxidant activity.
14 April 2010 - Today, the European Food Safety Agency published a scientific opinion on the safety of steviol glycosides as sweeteners in food.
Scientists in Sweden have found that cardiac glycosides, which are a family of naturally-derived drugs used to treat congestive heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms, may be used against colon cancer as well.
Forty-two patients with chronic, treatment-resistant schizophrenia who were maintained on optimal doses of clozapine were randomly assigned to receive 120 mg per day of Ginkgo biloba extract (ginkgo; standardized to contain 24% flavone glycosides and 6% terpene lactones) or placebo in addition to clozapine for 12 weeks.
Furthermore, apple pomace contains various types of polyphenols, especially chlorogenic acid, dihydrochalcone derivatives, quercetin glycosides, and flavanols.
Twenty-one flavonoids (15 flavonol glycosides, three flavone glycosides and three aglycones) have been found recently in Dryopteris villarii by Imperato (Amer.