glycoprotein

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glycoprotein

 [gli″ko-pro´tēn]
any of a class of conjugated proteins consisting of a compound of protein with a carbohydrate group.
α1-acid glycoprotein an acute phase protein found in blood plasma, an indicator of tissue necrosis and inflammation. Called also orosomucoid.
P-glycoprotein a cell-surface protein occurring normally in the colon, small intestine, adrenal glands, kidney, and liver, and also expressed by tumor cells. It is a modulator of multidrug resistance, mediating the transport of antineoplastic agents out of tumor cells.
variable surface glycoprotein any of several glycoproteins that form the antigenic protein coating of Trypanosoma brucei. The organisms contain numerous genes encoding hundreds of such glycoproteins and, by expressing individual ones successively, evade the immune system of the host.

gly·co·pro·tein

(glī'kō-prō'tēn),
1. One of a group of proteins containing covalently linked carbohydrates, among which the most important are the mucins, mucoid, and amyloid.
See also: mucoprotein.
2. Proteins containing small amounts of carbohydrate, in contrast to mucoids or mucoproteins, usually measured as hexosamine; such conjugated proteins are found in many places, notably γ-globulins, α1-globulins, α2-globulins, and transferrin, and are contained in mucus and mucins.
See also: mucoprotein.

glycoprotein

/gly·co·pro·tein/ (-pro´tēn) a conjugated protein covalently linked to one or more carbohydrate groups; technically those with less than 4 per cent carbohydrate but often expanded to include the mucoproteins and proteoglycans.

glycoprotein

(glī′kō-prō′tēn′, -tē-ĭn)
n.
Any of a group of conjugated proteins having a carbohydrate as the nonprotein component.

glycoprotein

[glī′kōprō′tēn]
Etymology: Gk, glykys, sweet, proteios, first rank
any of the large group of conjugated proteins in which the nonprotein substance is a carbohydrate. These include the mucins, the mucoids, and the chondroproteins.

gly·co·pro·tein

(glī'kō-prō'tēn)
1. One of a group of protein-carbohydrate compounds (conjugated proteins), among which the most important are the mucins, mucoid, and amyloid.
2. Sometimes restricted to proteins containing small amounts of carbohydrate, in contrast to mucoids or mucoproteins.
See also: mucoprotein

glycoprotein

Any member of a class of proteins linked to carbohydrate units. They are called conjugated proteins and are of comparatively small molecular weight. Some, such as follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and chorionic gonadotropin, lose their function if the sugar part is removed; others can continue to function even if deglycosylated. Some glycoproteins are cell adhesion molecules.

glycoprotein

any PROTEIN that contains sugars as part of the molecule.

glycoprotein

protein-carbohydrate conjugated protein, e.g. amyloid

glycoprotein

One of a group of conjugated proteins formed by a protein and a carbohydrate, the most important being the mucins (as found in the lens capsule, vitreous humour) and mucoids (as found in bones, cartilage, tendons).

gly·co·pro·tein

(glī'kō-prō'tēn)
One of a group of proteins containing covalently linked carbohydrates, among which the most important are the mucins, mucoid, and amyloid.

glycoprotein,

n a large group of conjugated proteins in which the nonprotein substance is a carbohydrate. These include the mucins, the mucoids, and the chondroproteins.
glycopyrrolate,
n brand names: Robinul, Robinul Forte;
drug class: anticholinergic;
action: inhibits acetylcholine at receptor sites in autonomic nervous system, which controls secretions, free acids in stomach;
uses: decreased secretions before surgery, reversal of neuromuscular blockade, peptic ulcer disease, irritable bowel syndrome.

glycoprotein

any of a class of conjugated proteins consisting of a compound of protein with a carbohydrate group.

glycoprotein deficiency
an inherited disorder in dogs in which there is defective phagocytic function. Affected dogs have a marked, persistent neutrophilia and are susceptible to infections.
alpha-2HS glycoprotein
important in bone resorption.
References in periodicals archive ?
This research is part of an effort to implicate glycoproteins in several processes, like protein stabilization and potential allergenic cross-reactivity in wine.
Hyperglycemia in experimental diabetic rats leads to a decreased utilization of glucose by insulin dependent pathways, thereby enhancing the formation of glycoproteins (Youngren et al.
Typing schemes based on other genes, like the one coding for the glycoprotein gN, have been refined over recent years (7) and can also be used to type Indian strains.
Denny's team is working to develop a marketable test for oral glycoproteins.
For instance, people with type B blood have galactose as part of the glycoproteins in their pellicle and saliva.
Evolutionary pattern of human respiratory syncytial virus (subgroup A): cocirculating lineages and correlation of genetic and antigenic changes in the G glycoprotein.
However, it seems more likely that the glycoproteins are correctly synthesized and that they lose the sialic acid residues on the termini of their glycan antennas as a result of the action of circulating neuraminidase excreted by the S.
c-src] is closely associated with the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PIK), and two adhesion receptors, glycoprotein (Gp)Ib and GpIIb/IIIa ([Alpha]IIb[Beta]3), are involved.
Understanding and analyzing the glycosylation structure of these glycoproteins is crucial for the successful functioning of the drug in the human body, as they may affect the drug's activity, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetics.
is a privately held cosmeceutical company engaged in the development of targeted and differentiated medical skincare products based on glycoproteins.
Table 2 Effects of SAC on glycoproteins (mg/dl) in plasma of control and experimental groups of rats.