saccharin

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saccharin

 [sak´ah-rin]
a white, crystalline compound several hundred times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sweetening agent, but now proved to be carcinogenic in test animals.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin),
In dilute aqueous solution it is 300-500 times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sweetening agent (sugar substitute); saccharin sodium and saccharin calcium have the same use.
Synonym(s): benzosulfimide

saccharin

/sac·cha·rin/ (sak´ah-rin) a white, crystalline compound several hundred times sweeter than sucrose; used as the base or the calcium or sodium salt as a flavor and nonnutritive sweetener.

saccharin

[sak′ərin]
Etymology: Gk, sakcharon, sugar
1 n, a white crystalline synthetic sweetening agent derived from coal tar. Although it is up to 500 times as sweet as sugar, it has no food value.
2 adj, having a sweet taste, especially cloyingly sweet. Also called saccharine [-rīn, -rin] .

saccharin

The cyclic imine of 2-sulfobenzoic acid, which is 500 times sweeter than sugar, used as an artificial sweetener.

Saccharin causes bladder tumours in rats if given in “mega” doses, and was temporarily withdrawn from the market; one pack of Sweet ‘n Low (a sugar substitute) contains 40 mg of saccharin.

saccharin

Nutrition A cyclic imine of 2-sulfobenzoic acid, which is 500 times sweeter than sugar, and used as an artificial sweetener. See Artificial sweeteners. Cf Aspartame, Sweet protein.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin)
In dilute aqueous solution it is 300-500 times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sugar substitute.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin)
Noncaloric sweetening agent (sugar substitute).

saccharin,

n the chemical sweetener benzosulfimide, which is 300 to 500 times as sweet as sucrose. Tests have demonstrated that large amounts may cause cancers in experimental animals. It is no longer in general use as a low-calorie sweetener.
Saccharomyces
n a genus of yeast fungi, including brewer's and baker's yeast, as well as some pathogenic fungi, that cause such diseases as bronchitis, moniliasis, and pharyngitis.