phosphorescence

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phosphorescence

 [fos″fo-res´ens]
the emission of light without appreciable heat; it is characterized by the emission of absorbed light after a delay and at a considerably longer wavelength than that of the absorbed light. adj., adj phosphores´cent.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fos'fŏ-res'ĕnts),
The quality or property of emitting light without active combustion or the production of heat, generally as the result of prior exposure to radiation, which persists after the inciting cause is removed.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorescence

(fŏs′fə-rĕs′əns)
n.
1. Persistent emission of light following exposure to and removal of incident radiation.
2. Emission of light without appreciable heat, as from chemiluminescence of phosphorus or bioluminescence of living organisms.

phos′pho·res′cent adj.
phos′pho·res′cent·ly adv.

phosphorescence

[fos′fôres′əns]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light, pherein, to bear
1 a glow of yellow phosphorus caused by slow oxidation.
2 the emission of visible light without accompanying heat as observed in phosphorus that has been exposed to radiation, which continues beyond a few nanoseconds after radiation has ceased.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fosfŏr-esĕns)
The quality or property of emitting light with neither active combustion nor production of heat, generally as the result of prior exposure to radiation, which persists after the inciting cause is removed.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorescence

see BIOLUMINESCENCE.

phosphorescence 

Luminescence that persists for some time after the exciting stimulus has ceased.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fosfŏr-esĕns)
The quality or property of emitting light with neither active combustion nor production of heat, generally as the result of prior exposure to radiation, which persists after the inciting cause is removed.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorescence (fos″fores´əns),

adj the seeming ability to glow in the dark; occurs in substances that continue to emit light following exposure to and subsequent removal of a radiation source.

phosphorescence

the emission of light without appreciable heat; it is characterized by the emission of absorbed light after a delay and at a considerably longer wavelength than that of the absorbed light. Caused by a number of bacteria, especially in seawater. One of them, Pseudomonas phosphorescens, may infect coldrooms via infected fish but does not constitute decomposition so that phosphorescent meat is still edible.
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