glaciation

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glaciation

one of the so-called ice ages; a period of ice cover.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the two analyzed the pattern of glaciation for just the last million years, they uncovered something new.
After the retreat of the Penultimate Glaciations, giant panda's second population expansion happened and it reached its population peak between 30~50 thousand years (kyr) ago.
Chitinozoan diversity is related to the transgression--regression phases of the Silurian Baltic basin, which are linked to glaciations, global sea-level fluctuations, water temperature and chemistry.
The current favourite involves congregation of the continents around the equator causing sunlight to be reflected and resulting in multiple global glaciations until dispersal approximately 590 Ma ago.
An analysis of organic-rich rocks from South China points to a sudden spike in oceanic oxygen levels at this time - in the wake of severe glaciation.
Our study suggests that the geochemical record documented in rocks prior to the Marinoan glaciation or 'Snowball Earth' are unrelated to the glaciation itself," said UM Rosenstiel professor Peter Swart, a co-author of the study.
hese glaciations, the most severe in Earth history, occurred from 750 to 580 million years ago.
This contradicts previous ideas which suggest the impact of the asteroid actually precipitated a period of glaciations, Gostin said.
Since much of the Arctic was covered by big ice sheets during the Ice Age, with the most recent glaciations ending around 10,000 years ago, the lake sediment cores people get there only cover the past 10,000 years," said Briner.
Washington, May 27 (ANI): New fossil findings discovered by scientists have challenged the prevailing views about the effects of "Snowball Earth" glaciations on life, which is presumed to be responsible for widespread die-off of early life on Earth.
The limited influence of glaciations in Tibet on global climate over the past 170000 yr.