monad

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monad

 [mo´nad]
1. a single-celled protozoon or coccus.
2. a univalent radical or element.
3. in meiosis, one member of a tetrad.

mon·ad

(mon-'ad),
1. A univalent element or radical.
2. A unicellular organism.
3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions.
[G. monas, the number one, unity]

monad

/mon·ad/ (mon´ad)
1. a single-celled protozoan or coccus.
2. a univalent radical or element.
3. in meiosis, one member of a tetrad.

monad

(mō′năd′)
n.
1. Philosophy An indivisible, impenetrable unit of substance viewed as the basic constituent element of physical reality in the metaphysics of Leibniz.
2. Biology A single-celled microorganism, especially a flagellate protozoan formerly classified in the taxonomic group Monadina.

mo·nad′ic (mə-năd′ĭk), mo·nad′i·cal adj.
mo·nad′i·cal·ly adv.
mo′nad·ism n.

monad

[mon′ad, mō′nəd]
1 a unicellular, free-living organism.
2 a monovalent element or ion.
3 a haploid set of chromosomes in a spermatid or ootid.

mon·ad

(mō'nad)
1. A univalent element or radical.
2. A unicellular organism.
3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions.
[G. monas, the number one, unity]

monad

  1. any single-celled organism.
  2. a single cell resulting from meiosis (instead of a tetrad).

monad

1. a protozoon or coccus.
2. a univalent radical or element.
3. in meiosis, one member of a tetrad.
References in periodicals archive ?
El copernicanismo de Giordano Bruno fue solamente restricto, a fuer de que el sistema copernicano del mundo fue objeto, por parte del filosofo meridional, de una plurificacion numerica infinitamente cuantiosa.
Ce sont plus de quatre cents ans passes depuis le jour que Giordano Bruno laissa entendre sa voix a La Sorbonne de Paris pour exposer ses theories.
Ricongiungendo a tale rinnovato prospetto le movenze piu radicali della tradizione giudaico-cristiana, la filosofia di Giordano Bruno reinventa una sapienza antica, arcaica.
Michael Servetus and Giordano Bruno each became ensnared in controversies over the meaning of the Bible.
Furthermore, while Giordano Bruno is indeed the youngest crater of its size anywhere on the Moon, multispectral images from the Clementine spacecraft show that the impact site is much older than 800 years.
Rather than cast as fictional protagonist of The Nolan either Robert Bellarmine, the saintly, scholarly intellectual backbone of the Inquisition or Giordano Bruno, the equally scholarly theological rebel who was burned at the stake by Bellarmine's superiors, Morton Yannow made the best possible novelistic choice: neither.
Palladio provided practical information on building all'antica, but it was the intellectual framework provided by the Neoplatonic writings of Pico della Mirandola, Agrippa and Giordano Bruno, which had a profound influence during the sixteenth century in England on the polymath John Dee, Henry Wotton (author of The Elements of Architecture) and William Laud (as Bishop of St Paul's in London).
In Italy, dialogues on the Platonic model were written by Torquato Tasso in 1580, Giordano Bruno in 1584, and Galileo in 1632.
The Italian philosopher Giordano Bruno (1548-1600) wrote and spoke of a multiplicity of worlds, of an infinity of space, of a moving Earth, and of atoms.
Rose Hersted of Portola, California, adds that Giordano Bruno had in the fifteenth century come to the sound conclusion that "necessity and freedom are one: hence, what acts by the necessity of nature acts freely.