ginkgo

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ginkgo

 [ging´ko]
the dried leaves of the deciduous tree Ginkgo biloba, used for symptomatic relief of brain dysfunction, for intermittent claudication, and for tinnitus and vertigo of vascular origin.

ginkgo

/gink·go/ (ging´ko) the dried leaves of the deciduous tree Ginkgo biloba, used for symptomatic relief of brain dysfunction, for intermittent claudication, and for tinnitus and vertigo of vascular origin; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and in homeopathy.

ginkgo

also

gingko

(gĭng′kō)
n. pl. gink·goes also ging·koes
A deciduous, dioecious tree (Ginkgo biloba) native to China and having fan-shaped leaves used in herbal medicine. The female plants bear foul-smelling fleshy fruitlike structures containing edible seeds used in East Asian cuisine, while the male plants are often grown as ornamental street trees. Also called maidenhair tree.

ginkgo

an herbal product harvested from a tree that is native to China and Japan.
uses It is used for poor circulation, diabetes, vascular disease, cancer, inflammatory disorders, impotence, and degenerative nerve conditions. It is also used for age-related declines in cognition and memory. Ginkgo is generally considered to have some efficacy against dementia, sometimes estimated as being equivalent to a 6-month delay in disease progression.
contraindications It is contraindicated in people with coagulation or platelet disorders or hemophilia, in children, and in those with known hypersensitivity to this product.

ginkgo

Alternative pharmacology
A tall tree native to China, the leaves of which have terpenoid derivatives known as ginkgolides A, B and C, as well as bilobalide and proanthocyanidins; as a group, these compounds have anticoagulant activity, act as free radical scavengers, increase the peripheral blood flow and are thought by some to slow age-associated memory impairment. The kernals are known in traditional Chinese medicine as bai guo, Salisburia adiantifolia, white nut, ying hsing and ying xing; the root is designated bai guo gen.
 
Chinese medicine
Gingko roots and kernels (with greater potency in the latter) are anthelmintic, antitussive, astringent, cardiotonic and sedative; gingko is used to treat alcoholic binges, asthma, bladder infections, cough, gonorrhoea and tuberculosis. 

Herbal medicine
Gingko is used to increase cerebral blood flow, prevent blood clots, mood swings, tinnitus and vertigo, and may be effective in asthma and phlebitis.
 
Mainstream medicine
Mainstream pharmacologic research has shown gingkolides to be effective in treating cerebrovascular insufficiency, which causes lacunar defects of memory, migraines, strokes and vertigo.

Ginkgo

—An herb from the Ginkgo biloba tree that some alternative practitioners recommend for the prevention and treatment of AD.
Mentioned in: Alzheimer's Disease

Patient discussion about ginkgo

Q. Have food supplements like Ginkgo Biloba been proven to delay memory disorders?

A. Many people are interested in the health benefits of food supplements, hoping that natural substances can have the same efficacy as drugs. The answer to this specific question is NO. A recent study that was published after testing 3,000 people has shown no difference between those who took Ginkgo and those who didn’t. There is no food supplement, including Ginkgo Biloba that was scientifically proved to have the capacity to prevent or delay Dementia. Eating Romaine lattice, broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach have shown good results. Fish with Omega 3 have shown good results too.

More discussions about ginkgo
References in periodicals archive ?
iyontoforez tedavisi, ginko, bakir, histamin, iyot, metilprednizolon, pilokarpin ve lidokain gibi iyonize mad-delerin elektrik akimi araciligiyla deriye uygulanmasi esa-sina dayanir (26).
In Taiwan Ginko owns Formosa Optical, a leading local spectacle brand.
Ginko has been proven to increase blood flow and delivers blood and oxygen to the sex organs as well as other organs in the body.
Real losses were suffered by users who deposited their Lindens in Ginko Financial, a Second Life-based bank that became insolvent in 2007, defaulting on the equivalent of US$750,000 in deposits.
The lower price point has been achieved by removing botanical extracts and replacing exotic fruits, such as guanabana and ginko biloba, with more mainstream fruits, including apples, oranges and bananas, which are now the core ingredients.
This pressure subsided with the subsequent revival of the Japanese economy, which meant that the toshi ginko (city banks) were able to dispose of their bad loans much more smoothly and quickly than initially anticipated.
Other drinks produced by Thorncroft include Rosehip, Cranberry and Hibiscus, Kombucha and Ginko Green Tea.
Herbs and nutritional supplements that have been found to be helpful for those with asthma include the Ayurvedic herb Boswellia, ginko, vitamin C, magnesium, alpha lipoic acid, the soy isoflavone genistein and limonene (found in the peels of citrus fruits.
Yoki, now called Ginko (Joe Odagiri), shows off his own de-bugging smarts when the owner of an inn (Lily) asks him to examine her staff and he correctly diagnoses an infection by the Wn of the Ah-Wn bug (script has a lot of such gobbledygook).
Certain botanicals are also contributors, including ginko, ginseng and Saint-John's-wort.