Gila monster

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Gi·la mon·ster

(hē'lă mon'stĕr),
A large poisonous lizard, Heloderma suspectum of New Mexico, Arizona, and northern Mexico.
[Gila, a river in Arizona]

Gila monster

(hē′lə)
n.
A large stocky venomous lizard (Heloderma suspectum) of the southwest United States and western Mexico, having black and orange, pink, or yellowish beadlike scales.

Gila monster

Heloderma suspectum, a poisonous, legged reptile, colored brown with orange spots and a skin covered with large beadlike tubercles. Venom injected by bites causes local pain and swelling that is soon followed by vomiting, shock and depression of the central nervous system.
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Gila monster. By permission from Cooper JE,Sainsbury AW, Exotic Species, Mosby, 1994
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Field observations of interactions between the desert tortoise and the Gila monster.
The reported size of the animal is more than twice the record size for Gila Monsters (Beck, 2005) and the coiled posture noted suggests that the observers actually saw a large rattlesnake (Crotalus sp.
Although the Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum) is widely distributed throughout the Sonoran and portions of the Mojave Deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, details of its distribution in California are imperfectly known, due to the apparent rarity of the species in that state.
While compiling Gila Monster records for California, Lovich came across correspondence from Mr.
A history of Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum cinctum) records from California with comments on factors affecting their distribution.
Redescription of the microfilaria, Piratuba mitchelli (Smith) (Onchocercidae) from the Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum Cope (Helodermatidae).
Gastrointestinal helminths of the reticulate Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum suspectum (Sauria: Helodermatidae).
found in Heloderma suspectum, and its larvae in a tick parasitic upon the Gila monster.
Photographs of all known Gila monsters from California are included herein, most of which have never been published.
His proclamation that the desert was dying from drought was in error, as was his oversight of earlier records of Gila monsters in California reported by Baird (1859), Woodson (1949), Funk (1966), and Bradley and Deacon (1966).
This was one of several Gila monsters reported by Funk from near Yuma.
It is worth noting that the record on the California side of the Colorado River is not the westernmost record of Gila monsters from this area (Funk, 1966).