intellectual giftedness

(redirected from Gifted child)
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intellectual giftedness

An innate, personal aptitude for intellectual activities that cannot be acquired through personal effort or learning.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in a recent review, Wiley and Hebert (2014) concluded asynchrony (the degree to which the gifted child may exhibit a mismatch between intellectual, emotional, and psychomotor capabilities) has not been documented as a cause of depression; that gifted students do not require treatment to fight off the effects of low-self-concept in any domain, except perhaps the physical; and that the incidence of unhealthy perfectionism and depression in gifted students is no greater than the incidence in the general population.
Replying a question, Shukor said he was not a gifted child but had deep curiosity about the Space.
A gifted child is generally considered to be one who has a higher than average intellectual, creative or artistic ability, beyond their physical development.
The advice that one gifted child gave me was: "If you want to know what will help me, just ask.
His good friend and sidekick Moreau (Idris Elba) makes contact to ask for help protecting a gifted child Danny (Fergus Riordan) and his guardian Nadya (Violante Placido) from the demonic Roarke (Ciaran Hinds).
His good friend and sidekick Moreau (Idris Elba) unexpectedly makes contact to ask for help protecting a gifted child called Danny (Fergus Riordan) and his guardian Nadya (Violante Placido) from the demonic Roarke (Ciaran Hinds).
A parent of a gifted child described the experience perfectly: "Having a gifted child is like being given the most powerful computer but no manual.
However, no gifted child displays all of these behaviors and it would be inaccurate to talk about "the typical gifted person," because gifted children (and adults) are a diverse group (McGuffog, Feiring, & Lewis, 1987; Robinson, 1981).
Society identifies the gifted child with high intelligence and is often hasty to identify this intelligence with specific subjects, especially exact or prestigious sciences," said Dr.
The chapters conclude with suggestions as to what can be done to support the gifted child at home, in the classroom, and in school-based settings.
is a no-nonsense guide written in plain terms especially for parents concerned about what the best educational recourse is for their gifted child.
In an empirical study of the bilingual language development of a gifted child, Pan-San Hoh concluded that "driven by a strong desire to communicate mental meanings to others, the gifted child often seems to be able to operate outside of the linguistic and cognitive constraints restricting the general population" (Hoh, 2005, p.